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More Wild Edibles (Read 2423 times)
Rat Man
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More Wild Edibles
Jun 3rd, 2023 at 3:32pm
 
    Throughout my life I've picked Honeysuckle blossoms, bit off the bottom, and sucked the tiny bit of sweet nectar out.  I just found out that the blossom itself is edible.  I'll have to try some on Pandora's walk today.  I also read that some Honeysuckle berries can be toxic if eaten in large quantities.  I don't even know what Honeysuckle berries look like so that's not an issue for me. 
    Also, since I was a small child I've eaten just the seed tops of the Virginia Pepperweed pictured below.  I just recently found out that the entire plant is edible.  I tried eating the rest of the plant yesterday.  It's quite delicious.
     Why do I care about such things?  Because disasters, famines, etc.. happen.  My knowledge of edible plants is money in the bank.  I can eat the lawn and the woods when others don't know how. 
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #1 - Jun 3rd, 2023 at 7:49pm
 
Good knowledge you have there, I reckon we might all need it in days to come. Unfortunately, there aren't many wild fruits around where I am, though I do know dandelions are good - pretty sure you can eat the flowers and brew a healthy tea from its root.
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Eino
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #2 - Jun 3rd, 2023 at 9:52pm
 
I've got to try dandelion sometime. I think I have some honeysuckle in the yard, so I'll have to try that too.

Red Huckleberries are my personal favorite edible plant I have access to, though. The only problem is that I need to be careful while picking them, as the huckleberry bushes are next to some holly bushes... I'm excited for huckleberry season.

Another delicious thing to do is eat mint and herbs from the garden. It's a tasty grab-and-go snack!
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Once, Toivo and Eino were building a house, but as Toivo worked, he would occasionally throw a nail over his shoulder. When Eino asked why he was being so wasteful, he said, “The heads are on the wrong side!” Eino looked at him and said, “You dummy, those are for the other side of the house!”
 
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Rat Man
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #3 - Jun 4th, 2023 at 8:34am
 
   With Dandelions the entire plant is edible.  Because it has a high iron content it is very good for you but that same iron content gives it a bitter taste.  I like bitter greens but not everyone does.  Your first taste of Dandelion might surprise you but if you give it a chance it grows on you. 
   The list of wild edibles one can usually find around his house is very long. 

Edit:  I should have written that the leaves are bitter.  The flowers are sweeter.
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« Last Edit: Sep 11th, 2023 at 2:51pm by Rat Man »  
 
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Rat Man
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #4 - Jun 6th, 2023 at 8:57am
 
A few days ago I tried Honeysuckle blossoms.  They're a little bitter but not bad.... about what you'd expect a wild flower to taste like.  They're certainly palatable.
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #5 - Jun 8th, 2023 at 10:25pm
 
I've made dandelion wine.  And like 'ordinary' Southern greens, dandelion greens are good stewed.  Not for hours, just 20-30 minutes with some herb and spices to develop a good "pot likker".
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Rat Man
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #6 - Jun 9th, 2023 at 8:33am
 
StaffSlinger wrote on Jun 8th, 2023 at 10:25pm:
I've made dandelion wine.  And like 'ordinary' Southern greens, dandelion greens are good stewed.  Not for hours, just 20-30 minutes with some herb and spices to develop a good "pot likker".

   Last night I cooked Dandelion greens for the first time.  I baked them with some Yellow Squash and spices.  Cooking takes a lot of the bitterness out of them.  They do shrivel up quite a bit though so next time I'll use more.
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #7 - Jun 9th, 2023 at 12:59pm
 
Egg cooked in boiling water 7/8 minutes, potato and bacon, and some raw dandelion leaves.
And you find the taste of paradise.
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Rat Man
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #8 - Jun 12th, 2023 at 3:07pm
 
     If the stuff ever really does hit the fan my ace in the hole would be acorns.  They are extremely abundant around here and no one eats them.  I would gather and process as many pounds of them as I could from late August through November.  I imagine I could process several times my own weight to get me through the winter.
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #9 - Jun 12th, 2023 at 7:31pm
 
Nice! Have you tried slinging them yet?
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Once, Toivo and Eino were building a house, but as Toivo worked, he would occasionally throw a nail over his shoulder. When Eino asked why he was being so wasteful, he said, “The heads are on the wrong side!” Eino looked at him and said, “You dummy, those are for the other side of the house!”
 
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Rat Man
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #10 - Jun 13th, 2023 at 6:40am
 
   Yes, I have.  Acorns make good but not great non lethal ammo.  They're not heavy enough.
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Rat Man
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #11 - Jun 23rd, 2023 at 7:59am
 
    Here's something you probably won't find in any book.  Most people know that you can make tea out of Sassafras roots.  But most don't know that the leaf buds, new leaves, and inside bark are edible.  As the leaves mature they're still not toxic but they take on a slimy texture as you chew them.  I guess as a last resort you could eat them.  We always found Sassafras berries horrible.  If they're not toxic the sure taste like they are.
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Rat Man
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #12 - Jul 21st, 2023 at 3:25pm
 
   Here in South Jersey the Choke Cherries are ripe.  They are wild cherries;  the ancestors of the cherries we buy in the supermarket.  They are smaller and more bitter than the cherries you're used to and they have a lesser pulp to seed ratio but they do have some sugar content.  They are certainly worth eating and once you get used to them they are quite good. 
    This is another wild edible that no one else in the town bothers with.  They're all mine. 
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« Last Edit: Aug 1st, 2023 at 2:18am by Rat Man »  

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Rat Man
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #13 - Aug 1st, 2023 at 2:17am
 
     Because it's been such a dry year here in the Delaware Valley the wild fruit is damaged.  Both Choke Cherries and wild grapes are withering as soon as they turn ripe.  In a survival situation you could eat the withered, dried up fruit but it's not very good that way.
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Rat Man
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Re: More Wild Edibles
Reply #14 - Feb 26th, 2024 at 4:14pm
 
    I discovered two more wild edibles that grow around here.  Mimosa leaves are edible when cooked, especially the younger leaves.  The flowers can be used to make a medicinal tea.  I also saw the flowers used to make moonshine on TV.  The seed pods are toxic.
https://www.marylandnature.org/what-are-those-fuzzy-pink-things-how-to-harvest-a...
     Also both the leaves and flowers of the Rose of Sharon are edible.  Live and learn.
https://eattheplanet.org/rose-of-sharon-a-beautiful-edible/
     I haven't tried either tree yet but I surely will this Spring.
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