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Living off the Land in the Wild (Read 883 times)
Kick
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Living off the Land in the Wild
Apr 27th, 2021 at 3:25pm
 
GeoWizard is a great YouTuber. He's done some great series where he travels in a completely straight line, across both Wales and Norway, being very entertaining along the way. His latest mission was staying out in the woods for three days with his brother. Now, like with his straight line missions, only the vaguest of planning is done beforehand.

He lasted 36 hours Cheesy

I really like him and his videos, but he's provided the PERFECT riposte to all these "survival" channels. Ok, so they're definitely not experts, but it only took a two days of bad tasting and poor nutrition and they were laid out. All these fantasists expecting to go and collect a bountiful woodland harvest... You better have luck and perseverance on your side.

https://youtu.be/qrsnnFgHZaA
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« Last Edit: Jun 3rd, 2021 at 4:43pm by Kick »  

You are a great guy Kick but also slightly scary at times. - Morphy
"Nothing matters, but itís perhaps more comfortable to keep calm and not interfere with other people." - H.P. Lovecraft, in a letter to Frank Belknap Long, 7 October, 1923
 
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Morphy
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #1 - Apr 27th, 2021 at 5:05pm
 
Some network should make a show with the most pipular so called youtube experts and let them see who lasts the longest just like in Alone. But instead of getting 10 items or whatever they get, they get just a knife. That would be really interesting.

Any guesses how long the longest person would last Kick?

As for this show props to them for keepimg it real. To me, these days, thats way more interesting then a guy larping as a survival expert.
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"I think this guy is the king of trolls of the forum, he waited 16 years just to say this. please pay your respects in an orderly fashion."-Sarosh
 
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NooneOfConsequence
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #2 - Apr 27th, 2021 at 10:16pm
 
They couldíve eaten nothing, conserved energy, and done better than that. Itís only 3 days.  Some people fast that long on purpose.  LOL
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ďMy final hour is at hand. We face an enemy more numerous and cunning than the world has yet seen. Remember your training, and do not fear the hordes of Judas. I, without sin, shall cast the first stone. That will be your sign to attack! But you shall not fight this unholy enemy with stones. No! RAZOR GLANDES!† Aim for the eyes! May the Lord have mercy, for we shall show none!ď† -Jesus the Noodler
 
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Kick
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #3 - Apr 28th, 2021 at 4:02am
 
I think one aspect that's interesting that only briefly got mentioned in the video is that they had to carry multiple gallons of water up to their camp site from the river. That's something all these survival experts often don't talk about: water and how heavy it is. It's also a lot heavier if you're exhausted and undernourished.

Morphy wrote on Apr 27th, 2021 at 5:05pm:
Any guesses how long the longest person would last Kick?


I'm going to be kind and say a week. I would really love to see a program like that. Some overly confident, beardy mountain man crying because he's gone two days without food and his bow drill has got wet would just be *Chef's kiss*
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You are a great guy Kick but also slightly scary at times. - Morphy
"Nothing matters, but itís perhaps more comfortable to keep calm and not interfere with other people." - H.P. Lovecraft, in a letter to Frank Belknap Long, 7 October, 1923
 
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J
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #4 - Apr 30th, 2021 at 3:51am
 
Pastoralism is a better alternative. Especially for slingers. And at least you won't be stuck to one location.
If you want to live solely of the land you will have no time to sling
https://youtu.be/iAdl63XpXX8

That or you need a permanent settlement and baskets full of processed acorns to get through the winter, and store them safely.
You can know all thousands of edible leaves and all the survival knowledge but it becomes fairly useless after a few days without food due to fatigue.
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Morphy
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #5 - Apr 30th, 2021 at 10:21am
 
J wrote on Apr 30th, 2021 at 3:51am:
Pastoralism is a better alternative. Especially for slingers. And at least you won't be stuck to one location.
If you want to live solely of the land you will have no time to sling
https://youtu.be/iAdl63XpXX8

That or you need a permanent settlement and baskets full of processed acorns to get through the winter, and store them safely.
You can know all thousands of edible leaves and all the survival knowledge but it becomes fairly useless after a few days without food due to fatigue.


Great video. This is amazing to see a guy with a channel like this make this sort of video. I question the whole 3300 calories per day seeing as hunters and gatherers probably didnt do that much but who knows.

I am so glad that this zeitgeist is starting to happen. These youtube experts are mostly hacks in buckskin.
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"I think this guy is the king of trolls of the forum, he waited 16 years just to say this. please pay your respects in an orderly fashion."-Sarosh
 
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J
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #6 - Apr 30th, 2021 at 1:46pm
 
It's good to know wild edibles, of course. And I do try to memorize and identify every unknown plant, tree and mushroom I can find. However, one can spend decades studying it and still would starve.

If you want to live off the land, you need a staple food.†

https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/71/3/665/4729104

† †† †† † ''These and similar data indicate that hunter-gatherer societies typically did not rely on many wild plant species specifically for energy. Rather, they had one or a few dependable wild staples (some also good sources of protein) that provided much of their energy needs. In nature, any dependable source of digestible energy is generally rare and when discovered is likely to assume great importance in the diet. Animal foods typically are hard to capture but food such as tree fruits and grass seeds are relatively reliable, predictable dietary elements. Furthermore, humans come from an ancestral lineage in which plant foods traditionally have served as the primary source of energy (14, 15). All else being equal, digestible carbohydrates are the most expedient way for humans to obtain glucose, the preferred fuel for the anthropoid brain and one source of glycogen. Humans are quick to appreciate the value of reliable energy-providing staples and will work hard to ensure a steady supply of them.''

---

Acorns are my favorite for a staple food. I haven't found anything better. This idea that they are hard to process has got to stop. All it takes is de-shelling, and boiling them once or twice to get the tannins out. Then you have the best carbohydrate-fat quantity nature gives. I did it last year, I plan to do it much more this season. Acorns are awesome.

If I had to live off the land anywhere in the world, I would pick a nice, Lush, temperate deciduous forest with plenty of white oak, a cabin, with all the tools I need for acorn processing, and plenty of creeks for fish traps, other seafood, fowl, and generally a low human population, or melting nuclear powerplants nearby. Too bad nearly all deciduous areas in the world are quite populated. It makes sense, because it's well suited for civilization. The Boreal forest is much harder, so if you want wildernes and fewer people, you go to the Boreal areas. But, there to survive off the land is much harder.
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Morphy
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #7 - Apr 30th, 2021 at 4:26pm
 
I agree. Heavily producing oaks are pretty amazing man. Its like a whole field of wheat that drops all in one area. Processing, even if it did take awhile, would still be far easier than working a field for a season and "then", having to process it all anyways.

Got anymore vids or thoughts on realistic hunter/gatherer stuff J? Seems like we think the same.
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"I think this guy is the king of trolls of the forum, he waited 16 years just to say this. please pay your respects in an orderly fashion."-Sarosh
 
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J
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #8 - May 1st, 2021 at 5:18am
 
I find its the little things that make the big difference. Hooking the worm so the hook cannot be seen instead of just pricking it on the hook with the hook visible can mean the difference between food for that day or no food. Similarily, cutting parts away of the notch on the bottom of a hearthboard to allow my oxygen to the coal on a friction fire set can mean the difference between no fire and fire. Likewise, not drawing down the poachers knot tightly but allowing some play can mean the difference between snaring something and not snaring it. You need to know the finesse to the general concepts in order to make them succesful and that requires practice and tricks.
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #9 - May 1st, 2021 at 5:19am
 
J wrote on Apr 30th, 2021 at 1:46pm:
It's good to know wild edibles, of course. And I do try to memorize and identify every unknown plant, tree and mushroom I can find. However, one can spend decades studying it and still would starve.

If you want to live off the land, you need a staple food.†

https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/71/3/665/4729104

† †† †† † ''These and similar data indicate that hunter-gatherer societies typically did not rely on many wild plant species specifically for energy. Rather, they had one or a few dependable wild staples (some also good sources of protein) that provided much of their energy needs. In nature, any dependable source of digestible energy is generally rare and when discovered is likely to assume great importance in the diet. Animal foods typically are hard to capture but food such as tree fruits and grass seeds are relatively reliable, predictable dietary elements. Furthermore, humans come from an ancestral lineage in which plant foods traditionally have served as the primary source of energy (14, 15). All else being equal, digestible carbohydrates are the most expedient way for humans to obtain glucose, the preferred fuel for the anthropoid brain and one source of glycogen. Humans are quick to appreciate the value of reliable energy-providing staples and will work hard to ensure a steady supply of them.''

---

Acorns are my favorite for a staple food. I haven't found anything better. This idea that they are hard to process has got to stop. All it takes is de-shelling, and boiling them once or twice to get the tannins out. Then you have the best carbohydrate-fat quantity nature gives. I did it last year, I plan to do it much more this season. Acorns are awesome.

If I had to live off the land anywhere in the world, I would pick a nice, Lush, temperate deciduous forest with plenty of white oak, a cabin, with all the tools I need for acorn processing, and plenty of creeks for fish traps, other seafood, fowl, and generally a low human population, or melting nuclear powerplants nearby. Too bad nearly all deciduous areas in the world are quite populated. It makes sense, because it's well suited for civilization. The Boreal forest is much harder, so if you want wildernes and fewer people, you go to the Boreal areas. But, there to survive off the land is much harder.


I have been cultivating a few southern live oak trees (Quercus virginiana) for this specific reason, as well as for the wood and to help with reforestation projects. I donʻt think they have ever been established in Hawaii, and the specimen I gave to a colleague ended up dying due to neglect, so I donʻt have any trees in ground or acorns to sample.

Any experience with eating the acorns from live oak?
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J
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #10 - May 1st, 2021 at 5:25am
 
Palatable after boiling them unshelled white oak acorns, more palatable after boiling and then roasting, most palatable after boiling, grinding to flower and adding salt, eggs, milk, honey and other things to make bread. But the first way is really all that's required in direct survival.† I only have experience with Quercus Alba. They are one of the last trees to shed their leaves, so if I still  see brown leaves in early spring from afar I can readily say they are oaks.
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J
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #11 - May 1st, 2021 at 5:35am
 
read you ment specifically live oak. I would eat the acorns from any tree
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walter
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #12 - May 2nd, 2021 at 9:37pm
 
Quercus emoryi no processing needed
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Perseverence furthers
 
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J
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #13 - May 3rd, 2021 at 5:15am
 
Beech and hazelnuts. very good.
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slingbadger
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Re: Living off the Land in the Wild
Reply #14 - May 3rd, 2021 at 6:24am
 
Right now the fiddleheads are coming up. Just boil and eat like spinach.
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The greatest of all the accomplishments of 20th cent. science has been the discovery of human ignorance† The main difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has it's limits.-Einstein† †I'm getting psychic as I get older. Or is that psychotic?
 
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