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The trick to a good sling (Read 1681 times)
Curious Aardvark
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #15 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 7:48am
 
guess it depends on your throwing style.

Fig-8 benefits from a more supple set of cords. Stiff sling are hard work in fig-8.

Actually in general - the longer the sling the more flexible the cords seems to be a good rule of thumb.

For balearic target shooting - ie: really short distances and a helicopter or sidearm throw - then short stiff slings are more suited.
For almost everyting else a longer more supple set of cords feels better.
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NooneOfConsequence
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #16 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 8:15am
 
Et tu, Curious Aardvark?† This is getting absurd! Are you going to back those claims up?† Like Jís original post itís a very authoritative sounding opinion, but itís just an opinion unless you want to offer a reason for it.

Or perhaps now weíre just trading arbitrary opinions as facts?† I guess I can play that game too... I want to try Grin

The best ammo for slinging comes from Himalayan granite.

If youíre going to sling figure-8 style, itís best to do it in Pennsylvania on a Tuesday.

Natural fiber slings work better if you soak them in purple dye unless you are throwing tennis balls... then blue is much better.
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ďMy final hour is at hand. We face an enemy more numerous and cunning than the world has yet seen. Remember your training, and do not fear the hordes of Judas. I, without sin, shall cast the first stone. That will be your sign to attack! But you shall not fight this unholy enemy with stones. No! RAZOR GLANDES!† Aim for the eyes! May the Lord have mercy, for we shall show none!ď† -Jesus the Noodler
 
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Morphy
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #17 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 8:49am
 
While I openly admit to having no proof my experience has been similar to CAs. We have both been dedicated to the Fig-8 for a long, long time.  Not proof at all but also not making any claims of it being an absolute.

I'm glad that was mentioned though so I can try out both the fig-8 and the side arm with my super stiff phone cord sling.

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JudoP
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #18 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 8:50am
 
I'm actually completely uncertain what the optimal stiffness/pliability balance is for slings and ammo of various types.

One very important thing I have noticed though, is that increased stiffness either side of the pouch can make slings much safer against premature drops, particularly with larger/rugged ammo as the pouch resists rolling on it's axis and dumping them out the side (longer pouches can somewhat fill the same role). You can test these by simply putting a rock in a pouch and shaking it enough to dislodge it, or applying an off centre downwards force on the projectile. Even adding whipping reinforcement either side of a pouch can bring about a drastic increase to pouch stability/safety. I first noticed this when I found my seatbelt slings were retaining large stones markedly better than some of my other leather pouches. On investigation I found that seatbelt slings are stiff and roll resistant due to the way the pouch folds and attaches to the cords, and even with a more slippery and less compliant pouch they were outperforming the leather pouches I had made at the time. Balearics also make a lot of sense in this context, they have unrivalled pouch stability (and generally a fairly long pouch too), perfect for large and uneven stones.

All this stuff around stiffness allowing control of release angle is interesting too, but again, I've had very clean releasing slings that are plain paracord, which as we know is fairly thin and pliable. Perhaps if you don't seek to control spin it doesn't matter too much.
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JudoP
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #19 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 8:56am
 
Morphy wrote on Jan 21st, 2021 at 8:49am:
While I openly admit to having no proof my experience has been similar to CAs. We have both been dedicated to the Fig-8 for a long, long time.† Not proof at all but also not making any claims of it being an absolute.

I'm glad that was mentioned though so I can try out both the fig-8 and the side arm with my super stiff phone cord sling.



My instinct is that more pliable slings work better with fig-8 because of perhaps a larger and more complex rotation from the hand which would be inhibited by stiffness. Stiffer slings also tend to be heavier and figure 8 for me is a higher speed lower force motion than balearic sidearm for example.
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J
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #20 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 8:58am
 
Keep in mind stiff and suppleness is a spectrum

I like single cord paracord sling if the cord still as the core, it has plenty stiffness to handle rocks I like.
But for me gutted paracord for a single-cord sling is absolutely useless, it's too limp
When it comes to paracord my favorite paracord is actually #275 and not 550



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Rat Man
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #21 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 10:37am
 
J wrote on Jan 21st, 2021 at 5:22am:
What's correct guys? For the tightest sling, braid it in a warm I or cold environment?


I would say cold, when the fibers are contracted.
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Curious Aardvark
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #22 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 11:24am
 
lol I should rent out my workshop to braiders then - currently 13c

Got some new tpu 'thermoplastic polyurethane' filament so printing sling plouches for a friend who just destroys the flexible pla ones.

Hoping this stuff will be a bit more durable.

She pretty much just chucks tennis balls for gundogs.
I use the printed flexible pouches as leather just doesn't like being wet all the time.
Even if the dogs aren't swimming - dog slobber will kill a leather pouch in no time.

So whether it's the wet - which Is unlikely as I've printed several of our pond pump connectors from flexible pla - and they show no wear aftera couple of years in the pond.
Or possibly dog saliva breaks down pla.

So we'll see how she fares with the new tpu.
It's a lot more stretchy and I can't tear or break the pouches with my hands.
I've also made them a little thicker

We'll see.

Ah yes - nothing to do with cords - although she never returns the cords from the broken pouch slings. Which is annoying as they are fine lol

what difference is 550 to 275 - I presume it's not the diameter ?
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J
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #23 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 11:41am
 
You should git some and see, it's the stiffest paracord that the paracord company sells, it's great for long distance
https://www.paracordplanet.com/paracord/275-paracord/
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Whoever fears God stands above all manner of fear. He has become a stranger to all the fear of this world and placed it far from himself, and no manner of trembling comes near him. - Ephrem the Syrian
 
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Kick
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #24 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 12:03pm
 
Rat Man wrote on Jan 21st, 2021 at 10:37am:
J wrote on Jan 21st, 2021 at 5:22am:
What's correct guys? For the tightest sling, braid it in a warm I or cold environment?


I would say cold, when the fibers are contracted.†

Wouldn't hot be better? Then when you move into room temperature it will constrict and get tighter. If you go from cold to warm or room temp, then it will get slacker.
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #25 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 12:34pm
 
fun fact: at 4įC water has the smallest volume. https://www.quora.com/Will-the-mass-of-water-increase-after-increasing-the-tempe...

any change in temperature up or down will increase the volume of water.

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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #26 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 7:25pm
 
Curious Aardvark wrote on Jan 21st, 2021 at 11:24am:
dog slobber will kill a leather pouch in no time.†


Iím not trying to constantly be a contrarian, but Iíve used the same leather sling for over 6 months. I throw between 30 and 100 throws every single day with slobbery tennis balls. It gets wet and muddy, but the pouch is still fine. I even had one that fell in a lake, and I didnít recover it for over an hour, but it kept working for months before I gave it away to someone else. Thatís all anecdotal, of course. What type of leather leather are you using?
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ďMy final hour is at hand. We face an enemy more numerous and cunning than the world has yet seen. Remember your training, and do not fear the hordes of Judas. I, without sin, shall cast the first stone. That will be your sign to attack! But you shall not fight this unholy enemy with stones. No! RAZOR GLANDES!† Aim for the eyes! May the Lord have mercy, for we shall show none!ď† -Jesus the Noodler
 
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Morphy
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #27 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 9:36pm
 
JudoP wrote on Jan 21st, 2021 at 8:56am:
Morphy wrote on Jan 21st, 2021 at 8:49am:
While I openly admit to having no proof my experience has been similar to CAs. We have both been dedicated to the Fig-8 for a long, long time.† Not proof at all but also not making any claims of it being an absolute.

I'm glad that was mentioned though so I can try out both the fig-8 and the side arm with my super stiff phone cord sling.



My instinct is that more pliable slings work better with fig-8 because of perhaps a larger and more complex rotation from the hand which would be inhibited by stiffness. Stiffer slings also tend to be heavier and figure 8 for me is a higher speed lower force motion than balearic sidearm for example.


I agree, well said. And I donít necessarily know if that is all of it but itís certainly a major part of it. Today is my last shift for the next four days so Iím hoping to get at least two tests done. Hopefully. Lol. Hopefully they will shed some light on stiff vs non-stiff slings, as well as other things that I think people may find interesting.
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joe_meadmaker
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #28 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 10:54pm
 
I was able to get some recording in today.  One sling with unmodified 550 paracord, and another with the core strands removed.  A much different feel between them than I was expecting.  I'll get the video posted tomorrow and will include some other thoughts at that time.
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Re: The trick to a good sling
Reply #29 - Jan 21st, 2021 at 11:04pm
 
JudoP wrote on Jan 21st, 2021 at 8:56am:
My instinct is that more pliable slings work better with fig-8 because of perhaps a larger and more complex rotation from the hand which would be inhibited by stiffness. Stiffer slings also tend to be heavier and figure 8 for me is a higher speed lower force motion than balearic sidearm for example.


I disagree. If you have a stiff sling, it resists rotation around the strand axis. If you get this rotation, you get crossed strands and the release cord gets tangled around the retention cord. No bueno.  You want something that resists twisting so the force applied during the wrist motion is transferred to the projectile almost as soon as it is made (ideally simultaneously).

I think in terms of following wrist rotation, which occurs with any throwing style excluding maybe Apache style, we can objectively say that a retention cord that resists twisting is best, regardless of throwing style.

In terms of a quick release, and the sling cords not interfering with the projectile, a very flexible release cord is best. At least flexible in the sense that it can have a small bending radius of curvature to facilitate moving the release cord out of the way of the projectile as quickly as possible.
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