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Wild food (Read 12481 times)
Morphy
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Re: Wild food
Reply #30 - May 29th, 2017 at 9:09am
 
Ive always wanted to try the inner bark of pine trees. Ive read the Adirondack used to eat it extensively. Considering how common pines are it would make a good survival food.
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Bill Skinner
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Re: Wild food
Reply #31 - May 29th, 2017 at 5:36pm
 
As long as you have the right kind of pine tree.

You do know that a favorite past time of eastern NA's was purging themselves.  They had ceremonies where they would drink gallons of a special drink until they started spewing at both ends.  Considering the amount of non digestable fiber in their diet, this was actually pretty wise.

And acorn eaters actually ate laxatives with every meal.

If you want to live of what the Indians ate, you have to eat all of it.  There are some really good reasons to eat everything, not just what you like.
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Morphy
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Re: Wild food
Reply #32 - May 29th, 2017 at 8:02pm
 
"They had ceremonies where they would drink gallons of a special drink until they started spewing at both ends. "

Around here we call it Wild Turkey. 
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walter
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Re: Wild food
Reply #33 - May 29th, 2017 at 9:45pm
 
LOL  Wink
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Re: Wild food
Reply #34 - May 29th, 2017 at 11:05pm
 
If you are looking for food you can get in the wild in order to survive, why not consider trying this https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1440598525/ref=mp_s_a_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1496113375&...; I don't have it though, but it looks usefull.
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Re: Wild food
Reply #35 - May 30th, 2017 at 6:29am
 
looks interesting.
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Morphy
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Re: Wild food
Reply #36 - May 30th, 2017 at 10:43am
 
There's also some apps you can get along those lines. This thread inspired me to check out a website called foraging texas. While doing that I found out that yaupon holly, which I always just thought of as a good arrow wood is also the only native Texas plant that produces caffiene. Apparently the leaves are slightly sweet as well so they can be brewed into a tasty tea. Very cool.
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Re: Wild food
Reply #37 - May 30th, 2017 at 11:11am
 
Steve Brills based out of NYC is awesome.  He leads foraging tours in central park. He actually got arrested for eating a dandelion in front of undercover park rangers in the 90s. He has apps, books and a website.
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Re: Wild food
Reply #38 - May 30th, 2017 at 12:49pm
 
Yaupon Holly is the only caffeine bearing plant in North America that is safe to make a drink from that I am aware of. 

Yaupon Holly can be prepared two ways.  Easiest is to drop some fresh green leaves in boiling water and let them steep to taste.  That will give you about the same amount of caffeine as coffee.  If you parch the leaves, you get a lot more, something like six times as much.

It tastes like a very dry green tea and a really strong, dry,  green tea with a slightly bitter after taste if you parch them, especially if you parch them too much.  We always added a pint of honey to about 5 gallons of tea if we were going to serve it to someone.

The berries are sweet but they don't add a sweet taste to the drink.

The Black Drink, which has yaupon as a base but with stuff added was the drink that the Native Americans used to purge themselves.

As far as foraging for plants, you really need to go out with someone who knows what plants are which.  There are a lot  of plants that mimic poisonous plants to avoid being eaten.  Some of them, you really can't tell from just pictures.
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Re: Wild food
Reply #39 - May 30th, 2017 at 3:17pm
 
Morphy wrote on May 29th, 2017 at 9:09am:
Ive always wanted to try the inner bark of pine trees. Ive read the Adirondack used to eat it extensively. Considering how common pines are it would make a good survival food.



watched  a program recently where a guy tried that.
Didn't give them any real sustenance and was exactly like eating wood.

They had aweek in deepest finland in the winter. The idea was to live weel off the land.
They barely got out alive. And if the english cook hadn't had the kiwi survivalist - he would have died.

In 7 days they managed 3 actual meals and chewed and spat out some wood.
One meal of berries and reindeer moss. One of about 3 tiny fish and on the last day they caught a small pike.

This while burning through several thousand calories a days. Oh yeah and the cook fell in a stream, without the other guy he'd have suffered frostbite at beast and fatal hypothermia at worst.

But because they had a decent meal of fish on the last day they reckoned it was a success.

I reckoned if they'd been there another week, they'd both have died. 
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Morphy
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Re: Wild food
Reply #40 - May 30th, 2017 at 7:11pm
 
@Bill 6 times as much as coffee? That sounds dangerous.

@CA- If I remember correctly the inner bark has something like 500 calories per pound.  Doesnt sound worth it. I wouldnt mind trying it though.

One plant I really enjoy is stinging nettles. Really tasty.
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Re: Wild food
Reply #41 - May 31st, 2017 at 6:18am
 
I had nettles when I was in Ireland. I like them. They like to put them in cheese. It had a taste similar to pepper jack cheese. Dulse, the seaweed has a slightly nutty flavor.
Question--how do you prepare the nettles so that the sting (uric acid) is gone?
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Morphy
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Re: Wild food
Reply #42 - May 31st, 2017 at 9:29am
 
Cooking them renders them safe. I used to eat the leaves right off the plants back in Cali. There are different subspecies so some may not be safe to eat raw. Ive only seen two. The ones near me were relatively safe to handle but the ones in the mountains would give a nasty sting that would ache for hours.
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Re: Wild food
Reply #43 - May 31st, 2017 at 12:25pm
 
yeah the cornish make a cheese called Yarg (really) that is wrapped in nettle leaves. Seriously good too !
https://www.lynherdairies.co.uk/cornish-yarg/

Given how much I've been stung by them over the years, you'll not see me gathering them any time soon Smiley
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Re: Wild food
Reply #44 - Jun 3rd, 2017 at 9:24pm
 
Wait until after the first frost and then pick them like crazy.  They make really great cordage then, just wilted but with green leaves, or just starting to turn yellow.  Take them and store them out of the sun but in bundles.  And don't let them get too dry.  And keep them as straight as possible.

Pick the leaves off.  Then roll them lengthwise in your hands to get the pith out.  You should be left with a bunch of long strands almost the length of the plant.  Use that to make cordage just like you make a Flemish twist bowstring..

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