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blacksmithing question.... (Read 1065 times)
Zorrro
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blacksmithing question....
Aug 5th, 2005 at 9:40am
 
i've got some nepalese (Gurka) kukri they make out of  truck spring steel stock, i think it's not hardened cause edge steel bent back when trying to chop some wood as if you were chopping a steel bar. So i'm thinking take out the handles and try to harden the blade,  Is it possible? What should i do to harden it?  would it be a reliable blade after the hardening?
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Re: blacksmithing question....
Reply #1 - Aug 5th, 2005 at 2:57pm
 
Its my understanding that after you shape the steel you have 3 things to cool off the metal, water, salt water, and olive oil. You would use the water for harder stuff, the salt water for the softer and the olive oil for the softest stuff. But maybe all this only pertains to forging.
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Re: blacksmithing question....
Reply #2 - Aug 5th, 2005 at 9:41pm
 
Quote:
olive oil


Don't you mean any kind of oil. In my metalegy class you can use water, air, salt water (brine), and oil (I use non detergent motor oil).

  Quote:
i've got some nepalese (Gurka) kukri they make out of  truck spring steel stock


Unless it is very cheap knife then it is proably ment to bend some. It will not break in half this way.

Quote:
Is it possible? What should i do to harden it?


Reheat it until is hot, you will know if it is at the right temp if you stick a magnet to it and it does not stick to it. That tells you that it is at the right tempature. Then rapidly cool it (in oil, water, air, or salt water). The faster you cool it the harder (generally, if it has enough carbon in it to begin with) it will be. Having a rockwell scale would be good to see how hard it is. Then just temper it about once to stress releave it and you arre done. All of this depends on the amount of carbon you have in the steel to begin with. If you have very little you may need to add carbon with a carboninzing poweder. If you have a lot of carbon the more you will proably have to temp the blade.

Quote:
would it be a reliable blade after the hardening?


Yes it is at the right hadness at the end. Remember you don't want something like what you have to be over a 60- 55 rockwell. It will proably be to hard for such a long knife. I would think anything under a 40 rockwell wouldn't be good either, to soft. I hope this helps.
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Zorrro
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Re: blacksmithing question....
Reply #3 - Aug 6th, 2005 at 10:30am
 
Quote:
....Then just temper it about once to stress releave it and you arre done.

Thanks for the answers .
How is this temper done? what if i temper the blade more than once?
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Re: blacksmithing question....
Reply #4 - Aug 6th, 2005 at 11:00am
 
You temper a blade some where between 500-800 degrees ferinhet. You can temper the blade more than once, but you lose hardness each time. You can also temper it longer too. Remember that when you temper the blade you want it to cool slowly. No water or oil
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