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Correctly Slinging "Footballs" (Read 2334 times)
mgreenfield
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Correctly Slinging "Footballs"
Dec 24th, 2003 at 10:05am
 
Ancient sling ammo is generally football shaped, and I've wondered why.   The football shape would have advantage only if launched point-at-the-front, like a perfect NFL quarterback pass.  I've doubted the possibility of doing this consistently.

This morning I woke up knowing how this might be done.  I'd be interested in comments and results of experiments by experienced slingers.  Here's how I think a perfect NFL quarterback pass can be thrown with a sling.

1/ The grip - The two cords as far apart as comfortably possible in the hand.  Trigger string between thumb and curled forefinger.  Retained string exiting the hand as close to the pinky finger as possible.

2/ The Windup - Overhand, underhand, or whatever, BUT keeping a line through the knuckles perpendicular to the line of aim as much of the time as possible

3/ The Release - ABSOLUTELY with a line through the knuckles perpendicular to the line of aim.   Fast-pitch softball players (overhand or underhand) should excel in this.

This technique should put the "football" point toward the target at the instant of release.   As the trigger string is released, the "football" should roll out of the pocket, putting a stabilizing "rifle spin" on the "football".

Perfection in this "rifle-spin-on-a-football" technique would have made the ancient slingers absolutely deadly in range and accuracy.

Great in theory.   Does it work??    mgreenfield
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Chris
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Re: Correctly Slinging "Footballs"
Reply #1 - Jan 6th, 2004 at 4:56pm
 
Do you really think that is possible to do consistently?  Sounds pretty brutal!  I think there is a much simpler technique that would have been easily employed by these ancient armies.  They needed to fire a continuos hail of bullets to kill their foe, not think about how to put a spin on the projectile... Anybody got ideas?

Chris
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Whipartist
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Re: Correctly Slinging "Footballs"
Reply #2 - Jan 13th, 2004 at 4:52am
 
Just to add a point.  The distance on your hand between your release cord and retention cord, could be a factor.  Probably not, but could be.  Leave no rocks unturned.  Put your retention on your outside little finger, and there's a little something to think about for a while anyway.

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mgreenfield
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Re: Correctly Slinging "Footballs"
Reply #3 - Jan 16th, 2004 at 7:49pm
 
...just got my imported Peruvian slings from Ben/Whipartist, and maybe made very important discovery!  (Probably not).   The cords are very flexible, BUT torsionally fairly stiff, ....that is, they dont want to twist very much.   Is this characteristic important in slinging glandes point-first with consistency?  Important for accuracy?    Fat cords with torsional stiffness better overall for good slinging than thin cords with low air drag?   Any ideas?   The mystery deepens!   mgreenfield
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Whipartist
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Re: Correctly Slinging "Footballs"
Reply #4 - Jan 18th, 2004 at 1:08am
 
I don't know much about how elasticity effects either power, accuracy, or projectile release, but the cords resistence to twisting certainly can't hurt. 

I started out slinging with boot strings and a kangaroo leather cradle.  It was ok, but twisted some in flight.  When I started braiding slings, the cords were very resistent to twisting and as a result my slinging improved quite a bit. 

This effect can be had with smaller cords too, if they're braided tightly.  I think the most twist resistent of the braids is the whip plait with a core.  I did this braid on my early braided slings and it is more resistent to twisting than the traditional Peruvian sling braids.  It consists of two interlocking spirals going in opposite directions, and locking and overlapping eachother, over a core.  It produces a very hard and firm braid.


                                Ben
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