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Native American Artifacts (Read 1000 times)
Morphy
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Native American Artifacts
Aug 13th, 2018 at 9:38pm
 
Unfortunately the flash reflection sort of messed up some of these pics. I wish I had stopped to check but was on a time limit.

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Ulu knives

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Inuit harpoon points

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Inuit bolas

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Adzes

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Close up of Lakota arrows and Plains Indian quiver

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Tobacco pouch

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Sinew-backed gull wing Lakota bow. Bow case. Shoulder strap, quiver. Arrows.

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War club. Tomahawk. Horse "whip". (Can't remember name applied to this. Basically used to give horse more...incentive.) peace pipe. Tobacco pouch.

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vetryan15
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Re: Native American Artifacts
Reply #1 - Aug 13th, 2018 at 10:45pm
 
That's some impressive pieces
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Re: Native American Artifacts
Reply #2 - Aug 14th, 2018 at 9:41am
 
Really amazing craftsmanship. The Inuit snow goggles caught my eye because I've been wanting to have a go at making a pair myself. I love all manner of googles, eye pieces and masks and the amount of effort and design work that went into some of the examples I've seen is really impressive.
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Bill Skinner
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Re: Native American Artifacts
Reply #3 - Aug 14th, 2018 at 1:12pm
 
Is that a solid copper knife?

BTW, those aren't harpoon points in the sense they were used to hunt seals and such, they have been finding lots of them inland in snow patches, apparently, they were primarily used to hunt caribou that would lay in the snow patches to cool off during the summer heat.  Caribou stay in herds, the Inuit didn't want to lose an animal they hit, so those points were designed to stay in and keep the wound open so they could follow the blood trail.

The only actual harpoon point is the one on the far right,(#9) it's a toggle point and it was for whale or walrus hunting.
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Re: Native American Artifacts
Reply #4 - Aug 14th, 2018 at 1:31pm
 
It definitely looks like copper in the picture but up close it didn't. I was under the impression it was a tool for defleshing hides. What do you think? I believe they used caribou bone before they had metal.
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Bill Skinner
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Re: Native American Artifacts
Reply #5 - Aug 15th, 2018 at 11:43am
 
The side walls on ribs are actually pretty thin, I suppose it could be used but I lean more towards a shoulder blade.  Maybe moose or caribou?  Possibly seal, walrus or bear?

Shoulder blades were used as hoes here in the southeast, they were made into tools to chop reeds for baskets out west, so they are plenty tough.

Inuit were some of the first people to use metal, there are copper nuggets in several places up there, they picked them up and heated and hammered into shape starting at least 7000 years ago.  Possibly, quite a bit sooner, there are finished tools that date that far back, to my knowledge, there haven't been any older found but I really haven't looked into the Inuit that much.  Most of what I found out was researching copper use in the southeastern Mississippian and earlier Woodland cultures.  And the Wisconsin Copper Culture started about 7K years ago, roughly. 

I can't tell but it looks like the bowl of the spoon is made of copper as does one of the ulu, and one of the adze.
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Morphy
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Re: Native American Artifacts
Reply #6 - Aug 15th, 2018 at 2:02pm
 
I need to go back there and get more pictures and do it in a more organized fashion. In these pictures I don't remember if the adzes are part of the Inuit display or the Pacific Northwest Indians.

I suspect if anyone were to use adzes it would have to be the PNW tribes. Looking through my pictures I have two with my daughter standing in front a giant totem pole followed immediately by the adzes and then into the Inuit section so it's possible the adzes were associated with the PNW tribes or the Inuits. Either way they are very much more complicated tools than people generally associate with typical Native American technology.

I was personally going from one exhibit to the next to get pictures of their weaponry since that is my area of interest. I can't wait to go back and see what else I can find. Hoping to find atlatls in the Mayan or Aztec areas.
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Re: Native American Artifacts
Reply #7 - Aug 15th, 2018 at 5:51pm
 
Of course, I have never heard of naturally occurring copper deposits among the PNW region. But I was thinking perhaps these aren't terribly old and they were obtained through trade with European settlers.

I would like to post the totem pole, it is pretty amazing but my daughter is in the picture so probably not a good idea.
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Re: Native American Artifacts
Reply #8 - Aug 15th, 2018 at 5:52pm
 
You might enjoy a trip to the MOA in Vancouver (Vancouver, Canada that is...).
Beautiful baskets, that's all I say. And I could slap myself that I didn't buy a certain book, because I still couldn't figure out how exactly they are made.
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Re: Native American Artifacts
Reply #9 - Aug 17th, 2018 at 2:15pm
 
There are copper deposits all over Alaska, and I'm pretty sure there are some in northern Canada, too.  Normally, most of the deposits are nuggets from BB size to the size of small cars.

There is no proof that the natives or the Inuit ever smelted copper, apparently, they hammered, heated and hammered some more to get their finished tools.  Some of the tools supposedly show evidence of being heated and hammered over 60 times before the tool was finished.  I'm not sure how that was determined.

I do know that a retired blacksmith was able to re create a large number of copper tools used by the WCC, he had to do as many as 30 heat and hammer cycles to finish some of the the tools.  He used green or soaked white oak for his fuel.  And with just fanning, his fire got hot enough to melt silver, which is in some of the copper nuggets in small amounts.  And that same melted trace silver is found on some of the WCC tools.
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Morphy
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Re: Native American Artifacts
Reply #10 - Aug 17th, 2018 at 11:57pm
 
Teg wrote on Aug 15th, 2018 at 5:52pm:
You might enjoy a trip to the MOA in Vancouver (Vancouver, Canada that is...).
Beautiful baskets, that's all I say. And I could slap myself that I didn't buy a certain book, because I still couldn't figure out how exactly they are made.


I'm sure I would. Give me a good museum over an amusment park any day.
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