Welcome, Guest. Please Login
SLINGING.ORG
 
Home Help Search Login


Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print
Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets (Read 12333 times)
alpine
Tiro
**
Offline


alpinslingin

Posts: 22
Gender: male
Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Feb 23rd, 2011 at 11:36pm
 
Here are a couple of posts that I put into a new thread to collect comments:

I appreciate the more authentic and traditional slings pictured on this site, showing the weaving, complexity, ingenuity, materials, release mechanisms, projectiles, slinging styles, etc. that people come up with. It is interesting to see so many variations on such a seemingly simple design as a sling. Although I like the braided designs, I donít think I am up to making them (yet), so I have been experimenting with more simple designs using paracord.

One modern material I think may have been overlooked for making slinging pockets is hard mesh replacement pocket material for lacrosse sticks. I used to play in college and it occurred to me that this would make a good sling pocket. This material is designed for making cupped pockets. The hard mesh is fairly stiff, but conforms well. The mesh replacement pockets cost about 8 bucks on the internet, come in many different (and bright) colors and you can make many sling pockets out of one piece of replacement mesh. †

The first sling pictured was built horizontally and has a large pocket for golf or tennis balls. It doesnít need to be nearly so large, but I am only starting to experiment with this material. Used in the horizontal direction, the mesh makes more of a rectangle and expands when pulled at the ends, like an accordion. I am guessing this is best for larger projectiles like golf or tennis balls since the mesh stretches out and might grab too much with smaller and pointy projectiles such as rocks. †

The second sling uses the mesh in the vertical direction, where the mesh makes more of the diamond shape that seems to be best for slinging pockets. When oriented this way, the mesh pulls together tighter and doesnít stretch much when pulled at the ends. †This seems to be best for odd shaped rocks since the holes in the mesh stay smaller and there is less wind resistance.

For a basic mesh sling, total construction time with paracord is about 10 minutes. I used simple larks head knots to tie off the paracord to the mesh and allow the paracord to be adjusted for length very quickly and easily without cutting off excess. I have also been experimenting with using a fly-tying bobbin to wrap the ends of the paracord to the mesh, instead of using a knot. Although it is more permanent, it looks cleaner to me this way. If you find the right kind of fly-tying thread, you can use a lighter to melt it a bit when you are done, just like with the paracord.

I could see other ways of using this mesh that I havenít tried yet, such as using the mesh as a base to thread the paracord thru, filling up the holes of the mesh to make more of a solid pocket. The mesh can be pinched together at the ends as well, depending on your design, to make more of a cupped pocket. I have seen some sling designs where the cord diverges into two pieces and makes the pocket, where the mesh could be used in between. Iím sure there are lots of ways I havenít thought of.

I would really like to see what the more experienced slingers think of this material and the different designs that can be made using it. Hope this inspires some more ideas for slings and I look forward to seeing how other folks use it. †

Interesting site.
Back to top
 

1_005.jpg (1080 KB | 299 )
1_005.jpg
 
IP Logged
 
alpine
Tiro
**
Offline


alpinslingin

Posts: 22
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #1 - Feb 23rd, 2011 at 11:37pm
 
Here's another mesh version. I don't know if the mesh provides any real benefit or not yet. They work as well as my all-paracord version. I can throw pretty hard with them, but am just not experienced enough to really be able to evaluate the mesh against other materials as far as accuracy, speed/distance. The good thing is that you can crank out different versions in minutes to tweak a design. 

One thing to note if you want to try this material is that replacement mesh pockets are sold in kits or separately. Be sure to buy the mesh material only. The kits sometimes include a bunch of stringing for a lacrosse head that you won't need and the kits cost more. I got the mesh(only) at Dicks Sporting goods, which had them in a lot of different colors, grey (silver), black, bright yellow, bright orange, blue, etc. The one I got is called the "Warrior Lacrosse String Kit - Part A Hard Mesh" for $9.99USD. There are alot of other brands out there too, that cost a little less. The mesh in general is impregnated with wax, which is what makes it conform and allows you to shape it.

Let me know what you think about it, good or bad. 

I am currently re-weaving my all-paracord version, trying to figure out how to get the pocket weaved so tight together. I can still see daylight thru mine.
Back to top
 

2_004.jpg (23 KB | )
2_004.jpg
 
IP Logged
 
alpine
Tiro
**
Offline


alpinslingin

Posts: 22
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #2 - Feb 23rd, 2011 at 11:39pm
 
Here is a picture of the fly-tying bobbin that I use to help wrap the thread real tight. I am using thread to wrap the paracord ends together, instead of using a knot to attach the paracord to the mesh. It makes it look cleaner and maybe you get a little bit less wind resistance without a paracord knot? Once I get done with wrapping the thread, I finish it with a couple over hand knots to tie off the thread. I found that if you use a polyester-type thread, it will melt in the same way that paracord does, so that you can (lightly) melt the ends of the wrap to prevent fraying, like you do with the ends of paracord. This takes a light touch, so as not to burn the wrapping, but works pretty good. As Masiakasaurus pointed out, if you melt the wrapping itself, it might get too hard and crack under the repeated stress of throwing. If you use the same color as the paracord, or something bright, like red, it gives it a real finished look.

Back to top
 

3_003.jpg (1185 KB | 256 )
3_003.jpg
 
IP Logged
 
alpine
Tiro
**
Offline


alpinslingin

Posts: 22
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #3 - Feb 24th, 2011 at 12:00am
 
I got to sling some rocks over the long weekend and noticed that the pocket needs to be broken in a bit at first, since it is still pretty stiff from the wax. Just like a lacrosse pocket, it needs time to soften up before it is really good. Some of the projectiles would slide out once in awhile before I got the sling moving fast enough to lock them in (probably more to do with my technique than the sling). The mesh needs to be soft to make a more cupped pocket. I thought about putting a rock in, then heating it up slightly to soften the wax to form a better pocket... or just keep throwing until it breaks in more.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Rat Man
Slinging.org Moderator
*****
Offline


Slinging Rocks!

Posts: 11299
New Jersey, USA
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #4 - Feb 24th, 2011 at 7:10am
 
Hi, alpine;
   Welcome.  Those are some good looking slings.  I don't think that anyone has used Lacrosse stick material for sling pouches before.  Nice work.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Bill Skinner
Slinging.org Moderator
Forum Moderator
*****
Offline


Slinging Rocks!

Posts: 3107
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #5 - Feb 24th, 2011 at 12:26pm
 
Hello, that is a neat idea.  So, how do they work?  Bill
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Rockman
Interfector Viris Spurii
*****
Offline


Slinging Rocks!

Posts: 1267
Lima, Peru
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #6 - Feb 24th, 2011 at 5:29pm
 
This should be on the FAQ. A good design for people with few braiding skills.
Back to top
 

Preserving the sling, mankindīs original Magnum. Rookie slingers are modern superheroes: Never far away from trouble. Rockman sling tutorial: http://slinging.org/index.php?page=how-to-make-a-rockman-sling---bruno-tosso
 
IP Logged
 
alpine
Tiro
**
Offline


alpinslingin

Posts: 22
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #7 - Feb 24th, 2011 at 11:59pm
 
Bill Skinner wrote on Feb 24th, 2011 at 12:26pm:
Hello, that is a neat idea. †So, how do they work? †Bill


Thanks. Well...I can throw pretty hard with them and hit targets once in awhile, so I guess ok. I'm still getting my technique down though, so it's hard to judge when the problem is with me or the sling.

With the first design where the mesh is horizontal, the sling is about 30". It is great for chucking tennis balls, so if you have a dog and a park, it would be good. However, I made the pocket too big so it slows down the throw on other projectiles. I haven't resized this one yet to try the horizontal mesh using real projectiles like rocks, etc. I will try to get this testing done and post the results.

With the second design where the mesh is vertical, the sling is about 32". I have tried rocks, chunks of concrete and golf balls, but nothing really heavy yet like lead. I think I could modify the shape of the pocket more and add some sidestrings to get the mesh pocket to cup more. When the sides of the pocket are not cupped, the projectiles tend to roll out the side once in awhile (probably more technique than anything). If the projectile stays put, I can throw pretty hard with this design.

I was also wondering if the paracord comes in a smaller diameter. I know there is some smaller diameter kernmantle rope at REI for climbing that would be thinner and maybe give less wind resistance?

In general, I have gotten the figure 8 throw down pretty good and am starting to get my timing down so I can throw with more of a baseball pitching motion and getting the legs involved more. Also, trying the sling technique as seen in the you tube video called "Slinging : 30 meters distance.Sling stone / HighQuality ". Don't know what you call that style, but it looks like a good way to throw pretty hard. I am mostly focused on technique and throwing hard for now and not worrying about accuracy as much. Also am starting to look for bigger and heavier stuff to throw. It's difficult though b/c I live in a condo, so practice space and ammo is an issue. That's where I am hoping some more experienced members can build, test and compare the material over time.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Rat Man
Slinging.org Moderator
*****
Offline


Slinging Rocks!

Posts: 11299
New Jersey, USA
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #8 - Feb 25th, 2011 at 6:44am
 
Rockman wrote on Feb 24th, 2011 at 5:29pm:
This should be on the FAQ. A good design for people with few braiding skills.

Yes, I agree. It is done. Congrats, alpine.  You made Frequently Asked Questions and Tutorials with your 8th post!!
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Dan
Interfector Viris Spurii
SlingingGuide Moderator
*****
Offline


Slinging Rocks!

Posts: 3962
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #9 - Feb 25th, 2011 at 7:33pm
 
@Alpine If you get the off brand stuff it's a little more narrow ,try the camping section at wal mart or gander mountain.
Back to top
 

"Like tying a stone to a sling is the giving of honor to a fool" Proverbs 26:8
 
IP Logged
 
alpine
Tiro
**
Offline


alpinslingin

Posts: 22
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #10 - Feb 25th, 2011 at 8:53pm
 
Rat Man wrote on Feb 25th, 2011 at 6:44am:
Rockman wrote on Feb 24th, 2011 at 5:29pm:
This should be on the FAQ. A good design for people with few braiding skills.

Yes, I agree. It is done. Congrats, alpine. †You made Frequently Asked Questions and Tutorials with your 8th post!!

Well, heck, that is really cool, thank you. I'm glad I could bring something to the forum, since I have taken so much away from this site already. The real test is going to see how this stuff performs over time and with different designs. I suppose if you wear out a pocket though, it is not too hard to replace. Also, the breaking strength of a single mesh joint (where you connect the paracord to the mesh) is pretty high. I couldn't tear apart a single joint with my hands, so it should do ok there.

I am thinking about another design that folds the diamonds together at the ends, so the paracord goes thru two diamonds. This might help the pocket cup more and prevent the projectile slide-outs.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Masiakasaurus
Slinging.org Moderator
*****
Offline


mah-SEE-a-kah-SOR-us

Posts: 6067
Alabama, USA
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #11 - Feb 25th, 2011 at 8:59pm
 
One of my favorite slings is a wide, flat, stiff piece of leather that doesn't cup and it also doesn't have a problem with dropping golf balls (slipperiest devils on the planet) so cupping isn't the most important thing in the world. It just helps a little. Wink
Back to top
 

PikŚru wrote on Nov 19th, 2013 at 6:59pm:
Massi - WTF? It's called a sling. You use it to throw rocks farther and faster than you could otherwise. That's all. 
~Engineers like to solve problems. If there are no problems handily avialable, they will create their own problems.~
WWW elsabio04  
IP Logged
 
Rat Man
Slinging.org Moderator
*****
Offline


Slinging Rocks!

Posts: 11299
New Jersey, USA
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #12 - Feb 26th, 2011 at 12:43pm
 
I like a little cupping but too much can definitely work against you by causing the projectile to hang up. †Just enough is great though. I use a lot of cupping in making my pj and similar type slings, but I almost never sit the projectile inside.. it sits on top perpendicular to the pouch, so hanging up isn't a problem at all. †Only the smallest projectiles go inside. Though I don't make my pj type sling pouches like this anymore, below is an example of such cupping. †I now make such pouches without the big, ugly knot at each end.  I also like a small wooden bead before the release knot.
Back to top
 

037Fx.jpg (99 KB | )
037Fx.jpg
 
IP Logged
 
alpine
Tiro
**
Offline


alpinslingin

Posts: 22
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #13 - Feb 26th, 2011 at 6:09pm
 
Rat Man wrote on Feb 26th, 2011 at 12:43pm:
I like a little cupping but too much...


Real Nice Sling and thanks for the advice on the cupping. I built one of the PJ type slings per the instructions as my first sling. It's a great tutorial and had me out and slinging in no time. Even with a loosely woven pocket, it works great and holds the projectile in well. I got some advice on how to tighten up the pocket from Masiakasaurus and just need to find the time to sit down and get that done.†I am on the lookout for an end knot bead to try one of those out next.

I think the mesh will not get too much of a pocket, as it will only stretch to a point, depending on the size of the pocket. I know the mesh gets better and softer as it breaks in, so I am thinking of ways to get that done faster. I might just throw a small piece in with the wash sometime, which should do the trick.

I might be spending some time in the LA area once in awhile and found out that the beach at Topanga State Park is pretty rocky. Might have to stop by there sometime and work on my technique. Good thing is that any rock you throw out into the ocean will eventually find its way back to the shore, isn't that like recycling?

Back to top
« Last Edit: Feb 27th, 2011 at 8:16pm by alpine »  
 
IP Logged
 
alpine
Tiro
**
Offline


alpinslingin

Posts: 22
Gender: male
Re: Lacrosse Mesh Sling Pockets
Reply #14 - Feb 26th, 2011 at 8:13pm
 
Well I found a great place to sling today. It is an old construction road a short walk away, had a giant puddle of water in the middle and an orange survey stake right in the middle. Perfect target for distance practice and I could actually see the hits b/c of the splash. I paced off 80, 100 and 120 paces from the stake and started testing my mesh and pj type slings. (I am 6'2" for reference.) The results were very interesting and not what I expected at all.

I first tried my vertically oriented mesh sling. It threw perfectly fine, but I was losing projectiles once in awhile out the side. It can only hold up to golf ball sized rocks, so I didn't feel like I was getting a good hard throw. Throws were about 80 paces but I knew I could do better with bigger, heavier rocks. Good sling, though I might tweak the design by increasing the size of the pocket to accomodate larger rocks.

Then I tried my pj type paracord only sling. Same experience, I could throw well, but could only hold projectiles up to a golf ball size and had a few slip out. Not bad at all. Good sling, but for me, at this point in my experience, needs a bigger pocket for larger rocks.

Then I switched to my horizontally oriented mesh sling and it changed everything. I started throwing asphalt chunks and rocks from golf ball size up to racketball size. I estimate some of them to be more than a half pound. That sling will hold whatever you put in it and nothing slipped out. With that confidence, my throws got really long at that point and my best throws were about 120 paces or more with a good trajectory. With the resistance of the larger rocks, my timing improved and I could really get my body and legs behind the throw. The mesh expands to a point, but it actually seems to 'set' the projectile into the pocket during the wind up. Once it is up to speed, it is fully stretched out and performs well. I could actually start to guide my throws where I wanted them and started throwing really straight. It even seemed easy.

I noticed that sometimes I was stepping to the side and out from under the figure 8 throw, if that makes sense. It caused me to lose power and my throws went off to the left (I am left handed). Once I staightened it up a bit more, I could really throw straight and far. Nice and relaxed like a golf swing, straight arm to the rear on the wind up and I was really getting the hang of a hard throw without putting too much strength into it. Just like someone else on the forum mentioned, a nice relaxed throw and good form gave me the best results. Seeing the rocks splash made it that much more fun! I learned a lot. I had to re-tie the knots once to re-connect the paracord to the mesh as they tended to loosen up, so I think I will go to a wrapped connection, instead of using knots on this sling. I think a release bead would help too. By far, this was the sling that worked the best for me and the pocket turned out to not be too big at all.

I used to pitch way back when and there is no way I could have thrown so many rocks by hand without throwing my arm out. With the sling all I did was get tired, but my arm feels fine. Just for fun I threw a rock with my hand out of a baseball windup. Seemed really pathetic in comparison to the sling...
Back to top
« Last Edit: Feb 27th, 2011 at 8:00pm by alpine »  
 
IP Logged
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print
(Moderators: Bill Skinner, Chris, Mauro Fiorentini, Rat Man, Masiakasaurus, Curious Aardvark, David Morningstar) - (Moderator Group: Forum Moderator)