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Slinging in Don Quixote (Read 4655 times)
slingbadger
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Slinging in Don Quixote
Oct 3rd, 2010 at 8:10pm
 
Yes, I'm tackling Don Quixote by Cervantes.
  In one scene, in the Spanish countryside, there is a great cloud of dust in a valley, due to sheepherds moving flocks of sheep. Quixote, in his madness, he thinks it's war between two armies, and charges into battle.
   The sheepherds yell to warn him off, then  " seeing that had no effect, they unbuckled their slings, and begin to salute his ears with stones the size of fists. Don Quixote took little heed of the stones."
  And "At that moment a pebble from the brook and, hitting him on the side, buried two ribs in his body"
  And " Another sugared almond (a glande????) almost hit him on the hand and struck the can ( that he was drinking out of) so fairly  that it smashed it to pieces, taking three or four of his teeth out of his mouth on the way, and badly bruising two of the fingers
of his hand. So hard was the first blow and so hard was the second blow that the poor knight was knocked from his horse and on the ground."
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The greatest of all the accomplishments of 20th cent. science has been the discovery of human ignorance  The main difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has it's limits.-Einstein   I'm getting psychic as I get older. Or is that psychotic?
 
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Steven
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Re: Slinging in Don Quixote
Reply #1 - Oct 4th, 2010 at 10:45am
 
Shocked Too long since I've read it. Sounds like I need to read it again.
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funda_iucunda
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Re: Slinging in Don Quixote
Reply #2 - Oct 9th, 2010 at 7:57am
 
If I remember correctly Don Quichote was on his way from the Mancha to Barcelona, that means he was riding in northern direction. So these skillfull slingers must have been from the Mancha or Catalonians, I suppose. Today Andalucia seems to be the only region in continental Spain where people still sling. Am I right?

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slingbadger
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Re: Slinging in Don Quixote
Reply #3 - Oct 9th, 2010 at 2:01pm
 
If I read the book right, yes.
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The greatest of all the accomplishments of 20th cent. science has been the discovery of human ignorance  The main difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has it's limits.-Einstein   I'm getting psychic as I get older. Or is that psychotic?
 
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winkleried
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Re: Slinging in Don Quixote
Reply #4 - Feb 25th, 2011 at 2:42pm
 
I'm pretty sure it was on of these passages that lead Pio Santiago on his quest that eventually enabled him to write the article on the Manchegan Sling

Marc Adkins


slingbadger wrote on Oct 3rd, 2010 at 8:10pm:
Yes, I'm tackling Don Quixote by Cervantes.
 In one scene, in the Spanish countryside, there is a great cloud of dust in a valley, due to sheepherds moving flocks of sheep. Quixote, in his madness, he thinks it's war between two armies, and charges into battle.
  The sheepherds yell to warn him off, then  " seeing that had no effect, they unbuckled their slings, and begin to salute his ears with stones the size of fists. Don Quixote took little heed of the stones."
 And "At that moment a pebble from the brook and, hitting him on the side, buried two ribs in his body"
 And " Another sugared almond (a glande????) almost hit him on the hand and struck the can ( that he was drinking out of) so fairly  that it smashed it to pieces, taking three or four of his teeth out of his mouth on the way, and badly bruising two of the fingers
of his hand. So hard was the first blow and so hard was the second blow that the poor knight was knocked from his horse and on the ground."

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aurelio
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Re: Slinging in Don Quixote
Reply #5 - Jul 9th, 2011 at 11:04am
 
slingbadger wrote on Oct 3rd, 2010 at 8:10pm:

 And " Another sugared almond (a glande????) almost hit him on the hand and struck the can ( that he was drinking out of) so fairly  that it smashed it to pieces, taking three or four of his teeth out of his mouth on the way, and badly bruising two of the fingers
of his hand. So hard was the first blow and so hard was the second blow that the poor knight was knocked from his horse and on the ground."

In fact the sweet sugared almond is a well-known in Spain that consists of a kernel of long range to that covered with a layer of sugar half a centimeter thick, resulting in a river pebble.
Congratulations for read "Don Quijote de la Mancha". Great book
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peladillas.jpg (1 KB | )
peladillas.jpg
 
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aurelio
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Re: Slinging in Don Quixote
Reply #6 - Jul 9th, 2011 at 11:05am
 
You can see the interior.
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Thearos
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Re: Slinging in Don Quixote
Reply #7 - Jul 10th, 2011 at 8:08am
 
At the risk of being my usual pedantic self, it's a joke, yes ? They didn't sling sugared almonds at the infortunate hidalgo, but big smooth stones, that look like sugared almonds.

The same idea, by the way, appears on an ancient Greek sling bullet marked "trogalion", meaning candy, sweetmeat.
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aurelio
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Re: Slinging in Don Quixote
Reply #8 - Jul 10th, 2011 at 8:37am
 
I have to improve my English. Do not throw sweet stones at Don Quixote. Cervantes makes allusion to the sugared almonds  ("peladillas" in the original) to indicate the size of the projectile just use the shepherds.
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HurlinThom
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Re: Slinging in Don Quixote
Reply #9 - Jul 11th, 2011 at 4:46pm
 
Sounds like Jordan Almonds to me.

http://www.nutsonline.com/chocolatessweets/jordan-almonds/?gclid=CN7MsrKT-qkCFQM...

Wonder if they originated around the River Jordan and came west with the Arabs.
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When all is said and done more will have been said than done.
 
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aurelio
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Re: Slinging in Don Quixote
Reply #10 - Jul 12th, 2011 at 2:53am
 
Probably, the most sweet almond in Spain, are of Arab origin.
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Thearos
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Re: Slinging in Don Quixote
Reply #11 - Jul 12th, 2011 at 8:57am
 
Not just, or not really, the size, more the smooth aspect.

You have to have sugar to do this sweet, no ? Which came with the Arabs.
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thabaill
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Re: Slinging in Don Quixote
Reply #12 - Jul 12th, 2011 at 5:25pm
 
Hi everybody.

Here you have the recipe  Tongue

Almond "Peladillas" recipe

Ingredients

    *
     1/2 kg milled sugar
    *
     1/2 kg toasted and peeled almonds
    *
     100 cm3 water
    *
     1 teaspoon of cinnamon (optional)

Method to make the "Peladillas"

1. Heat a saucepan with the water slowly.

2. When it is hot, you must disolve the sugar in the water. You must stir it constantly.

3. Now you must add the cinnamon, and stir.

4. With strong fire, boil the syrup until when it drops from the spoon, it made thick drops.

5. Add the almonds now and stir until the syrup form a thick coat.

6. Later, put the almonds on a sieve and shake gently until the spare sugar falls.

7. Use this spare sugar disolving it again, adding the almonds, until they are well coated.

8. Leave it cool and dry.
___________________________________

http://www.naturcocinasana.net/peladillas-almendra-receta/

A video http://actual.lasprovincias.es/turrones/como-se-hacen-las-peladillas/

I think that in The Quixote, Cervantes call the sling stones "peladillas", because some river stones are white in color, smooth and with the same oval shape. I think that the size of a peladilla is too small.

Greetings.
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