Welcome, Guest. Please Login
SLINGING.ORG
 
Home Help Search Login


Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print
question about the crossbow bolt (Read 4018 times)
dork
Funditor
****
Offline


I feel Smurfy when I'm
smurfing!!!! You too?

Posts: 995
In Beautiful Wisconsin
Gender: male
question about the crossbow bolt
Jun 17th, 2009 at 12:16pm
 
Does the bolt fired from a crossbow bend in the same fashion as an arrow shot from a bow or a dart thrown from an atlatl. They are shorter and seem to be much more stiff than the arrow or dart.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
timann
Interfector Viris Spurii
*****
Offline


Slinging Rocks!

Posts: 2504
Norway
Gender: male
Re: question about the crossbow bolt
Reply #1 - Jun 17th, 2009 at 1:44pm
 
No, they don`t.  Well, I have read it, and seen documentarys on tv,  they are supposed to not bend.
timann
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
slinger87
Funditor
****
Offline


I bet I can throw a rock
farther then you can!

Posts: 731
MI
Gender: male
Re: question about the crossbow bolt
Reply #2 - Jun 17th, 2009 at 5:14pm
 
I'm not sure, some crossbow bolts where meatal though
Back to top
 

when in dought, sling a rock a his head, if you miss, well, good luck!
T_skater_punk_16@yahoo.com  
IP Logged
 
Bikewer
Interfector Viris Spurii
*****
Offline


I love Slinging.org!

Posts: 1627
St. Louis, Mo
Gender: male
Re: question about the crossbow bolt
Reply #3 - Jun 18th, 2009 at 12:59pm
 
Bolts are generally shorter and much thicker than typical arrows; they may flex a tiny bit.   Also, the force applied to them is more linear; in a longbow the arrow tends to bend around the bow's grip area as it's released.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Typhon
Junior Member
**
Offline



Posts: 83
Blue Mountains.NSW. Australia.
Gender: male
Re: question about the crossbow bolt
Reply #4 - Jun 28th, 2009 at 6:29am
 
Dork. I'd be inclined to agree with those who say the bolt bends at least a small amount. A 15th or 16th century cross bow, the kind that required a cranquin (winch) to draw the string back could store a ton or more of force in the 6 or so inches it gets drawn. I find in difficult to believe that, apart from compression, there wasn't at least a bit of flexing on release. Note I said flexing. Any significant degree of bend or curve under those forces and I think the quarrel would shatter.
However if you mean the back and forth wiggle that an arrow under goes, especially if loosed from a non - centreshot bow. Curving around the hand grip, Archer's paradox etc. Then definitely not, the bolt would shatter under forces involved.
Of course if the thrust is STRAIGHT up the shaft axis then any flex would be so close to zero as to be utterly insignificant. On further thought I don't know, could go either way.  Mind you the Quarrel might get FATTER briefly. hmm, Does that mean it's got to stop bolting it's energy and fly to work off the extra size. The flying Dieter??Typhon.
Back to top
 

Never point a loaded sling at something you don't intend to shoot.
 
IP Logged
 
Bikewer
Interfector Viris Spurii
*****
Offline


I love Slinging.org!

Posts: 1627
St. Louis, Mo
Gender: male
Re: question about the crossbow bolt
Reply #5 - Jun 29th, 2009 at 3:23pm
 
I agree with your assessment...Mostly.   There are many different styles of bolts.   It's true that medieval European bolts are short and quite thick; I saw some in museums in Germany that were almost an inch at the thickest part.

However, there are varieties of crossbows from around the world that use longer and thinner bolts, and also position them on the crossbow so that the thrust is not entirely linear.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
David Morningstar
Slinging.org Moderator
*****
Offline


Slinging Rocks!

Posts: 3420
UK
Re: question about the crossbow bolt
Reply #6 - Jun 29th, 2009 at 4:17pm
 
The force on a crossbow bolt is not 100% aligned with its axis. The bolt runs in a trough and the point is below the level of the bowstring. This means that the point of the bolt is kept down by its inertia and doesnt do a backflip into the air.

The flexing of the bolt is minimal and does not affect its flight. If you look at various manufacturers you will see that when buying crossbow bolts you dont need to specify a value for spine or the draw weight of your crossbow.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Bikewer
Interfector Viris Spurii
*****
Offline


I love Slinging.org!

Posts: 1627
St. Louis, Mo
Gender: male
Re: question about the crossbow bolt
Reply #7 - Jun 29th, 2009 at 8:46pm
 
All true for contemporary commercial devices.    However, there are crossbows in history and in use in more primitive areas of the world that do not follow these design parameters.

As I recall, the Hmong of Cambodia use self-produced crossbows that shoot rather long projectiles.

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=Hmong+crossbow&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2&...
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
David Morningstar
Slinging.org Moderator
*****
Offline


Slinging Rocks!

Posts: 3420
UK
Re: question about the crossbow bolt
Reply #8 - Jun 30th, 2009 at 4:11am
 
Interesting stuff. This site quotes 19" for the bolt length. Looking at the bow, draw length and probable power, I reckon theres no flexing here.

http://therionarms.com/sold/ttoy331.html

It should also be noted that any flexing is going to be up and down, and will alter the point of impact up or down. This effect is likely to be swamped by the effects of range, elevation, variations in bolt weight and drag, all of which change the point of impact up or down as well.

The 'archers paradox' is visible for a bow and arrow because it changes the point of impact left or right.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
kuggur slingdog
Ex Member


Re: question about the crossbow bolt
Reply #9 - Jun 30th, 2009 at 7:52am
 
On a related note; Ive seen handbows with a "window" in the handle, serving as arrow rest. This would make it unnecessary for the arrow to flex around the bow, am I right in assuming that in using such a bow the flexibility of the arrow spine is less (or even not) critical as it is with a "normal" bow? Could you use stiffer arrows?
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
David Morningstar
Slinging.org Moderator
*****
Offline


Slinging Rocks!

Posts: 3420
UK
Re: question about the crossbow bolt
Reply #10 - Jun 30th, 2009 at 8:27am
 
Quote:
On a related note; Ive seen handbows with a "window" in the handle, serving as arrow rest. This would make it unnecessary for the arrow to flex around the bow, am I right in assuming that in using such a bow the flexibility of the arrow spine is less (or even not) critical as it is with a "normal" bow? Could you use stiffer arrows?


Yes, the 'archers paradox' effect is less pronounced when the arrow runs through the centre of the bow, as in modern recurve and compounds.
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Bikewer
Interfector Viris Spurii
*****
Offline


I love Slinging.org!

Posts: 1627
St. Louis, Mo
Gender: male
Re: question about the crossbow bolt
Reply #11 - Jun 30th, 2009 at 8:28pm
 
"Center-shot" bows eliminated a lot of problems faced by us more primitive archers!
Back to top
 
 
IP Logged
 
Typhon
Junior Member
**
Offline



Posts: 83
Blue Mountains.NSW. Australia.
Gender: male
Re: question about the crossbow bolt
Reply #12 - Jul 1st, 2009 at 5:03am
 
Bikewer.
There are also Crossbows from Africa that shoot short, a foot or so, very slim and light spikes from cane or similar. These would flex quite a bit Id think. Dont know of course.
I was thinking more of the historical European crossbows. Not bows from Africa or Asia or modern devices.
Typhon
Back to top
 

Never point a loaded sling at something you don't intend to shoot.
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1
Send Topic Print
(Moderators: Masiakasaurus, Chris, Mauro Fiorentini, Rat Man, David Morningstar, Curious Aardvark, Bill Skinner)