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Throwing techniques (Read 9659 times)
Curious Aardvark
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #15 - Jun 22nd, 2007 at 9:32am
 
backhand ?
first ever mention that I can recall. And there are definitely no videos.

But yeah I can see how it might work - I'll give it a go and let you know if there's any point to it.

It's possible some styles aren't used for a reason :-)
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wanderer
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #16 - Jun 22nd, 2007 at 12:51pm
 
I do recall a reference to 'backhand' slinging with respect to some Pacific Islanders I think. Unfortunately I don't remember whether the reference was on this site, on the web, or even it might have been in a real book. If I can find the time, I'll try to track it down.

I have tried slinging this way, but not seriously. I can believe it would be a feasible method.
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #17 - Jun 22nd, 2007 at 6:58pm
 
[quote author=curious_aardvark link=1174518354/15#15 date=1182519144]backhand ?
first ever mention that I can recall. And there are definitely no videos.

But yeah I can see how it might work - I'll give it a go and let you know if there's any point to it.

It's possible some styles aren't used for a reason :-) [/quote]

Backhand styles are generally confined to the Southern Hemisphere and as such are not widely known in Europe and North America. When one is suspended from the underside of the globe and in constant fear of falling off it is essential to minimize the time that one's hands are diverted from their main function of hanging on for dear life. Consequently the backhand flick was developed. Exponents are able use their especially adapted super short slings which hang down from the backs of their hands in between grasping tussocks of grass, tree limbs and other such hand holds.

Some particulary gifted slingers have learned to do all the most popular styles as seen in the Northern Hemisphere with their feet. Unfortunately have no photos as my camera fell off into space.
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Dale
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #18 - Jun 23rd, 2007 at 5:32am
 
I can toss a Frisbee better backhand than I can forehand, but I have not worked on the backhand sling technique enough to be good at it.  I tend to release too late, and it flies 'way off to the right of where I wanted.  Distance is as good as my Apache style, though, so if I get my aim corrected it will be a nice addition to the repertoir.  For the present, I am going to blame my difficulties on the fact that I am in the northern hemisphere, so the backhand is an unnatural style.
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #19 - Jun 23rd, 2007 at 9:05am
 
Dale wrote on Jun 23rd, 2007 at 5:32am:
the backhand is an unnatural style.


Frisbees ain't slings, and the above quote is the essence of why backhand isn't really viable for most people. Experimenting with unusual styles that don't have any real advantage just  messes up your natural style. Stick to what you have proven works for you!
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Curious Aardvark
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #20 - Jun 23rd, 2007 at 12:31pm
 
yep backhand, while technically a style suffers from several drawbacks.
1) Your sling arm ends up outstretched at the side of your body, so anything you might have been aiming at will have been totally out of sight till you've released the sling. Aiming sucks.
2) it's bloody difficult to accurately adjust for vertical variation - so accuracy sucks.
3) you pretty much can't do any kind of windup - so power sucks.

And as aussie says - it ain't a frisbee - so frisbee-ness sucks.

Backhand is ou of vogue for a good reason :- it sucks :-)
lol


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Dale
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #21 - Jun 23rd, 2007 at 1:02pm
 
Aussie,

You are quoting me out of context.  The proper context includes the bit about me being in the northern hemisphere, preceded by your comments about Southern-hemisphere slingers hanging from their toes to keep from falling off the world.  I almost fell for that, by the way... good job.

Seriously, though, the style which initially felt most unnatural to me, is the figure-8.  Perfectly natural now.  But you may have hit on why I can't sling so well, after two years.  I've tried every style I've seen described here, and thus made myself a jack-of-all-styles (and master of none).
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #22 - Jun 24th, 2007 at 9:05am
 
Greetings Dale,

I don't quite know what it is about this Australian penchant for telling tall stories. I think it comes from the fact that we do undoubtedly have unusual wildlife and many "Northern Hemisphereites" on meeting an Australian, seem to think we are all going to be as weird as Crocodile Dundee. BTW Crocodile Dundee (or for that matter Steve Irwin) represents the typical Australian about as accurately as Spiderman does the typical American.

Actually other than the season reversal and a few other little oddities, Australia is about as "normal" a place as you could hope to find. By far the majority of us live a highly urbanized lifestyle, work long hours to pay off our mortgages, love our kids and passionately follow our football team's progress during the winter season. I would bet many Australians have never even seen a kangaroo in the wild. Also the majority of our native animals are quite shy and often nocturnal, consequently difficult to find.

On the odd occassion I throw a Frisbee I also throw it backhand. It just seems the natural way to do it to get the rotation required for stable flight. Similarly with slinging I think it is important to adopt a style that is as simple and natural as possible that gets the desired results. For me "results" means the ability to shoot as accurately as possible out to an effective range of 30 - 40 metres. Ideally I would like to be able to sling with the same effect as shooting offhand with a small calibre handgun. To that end I have settled on the simple overhand as the most effective style which will give the results I am looking for. I just can't see backhand, helicopter or even the beloved fig. 8 giving better value for money. Having said that I do sometimes enjoy the extra distance I can get with fig. 8, but it's only the satisfaction of seeing the stone soaring off into the sunset; at over 100m I can't reliably hit anything anyway. I did have a go at copying Gunsonwheels style which I would class as low angle sidearm. But my mainstay will always be simple overhead.
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Curious Aardvark
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #23 - Jun 25th, 2007 at 7:16am
 
[quote]many "Northern Hemisphereites" on meeting an Australian, seem to think we are all going to be as weird as Crocodile Dundee. BTW Crocodile Dundee (or for that matter Steve Irwin) represents the typical Australian about as accurately as Spiderman does the typical American[/quote]

That's it ruin all my expectations. :-(

[quote]Australia is about as "normal" a place as you could hope to find[/quote]
lmao - as long as you define 'normal' as a place where just about everything that moves, swims or flies is lethally poisonous.
You're obviously using the word 'normal' in a thoroughly australian way :-) In england poisonous spiders, fish, snakes, lizards, more spiders, even more snakes and very big sharks - very much not normal.
;-)
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #24 - Jun 25th, 2007 at 7:28am
 
There is a video of Tint doing a backhand throw. I tried to do that, too, and lost my AussiePouch. (But AussieSlinger was so kind to send me a second one Smiley)
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #25 - Jun 26th, 2007 at 2:57am
 
C-A old friend,

You have obviously been sucked in by the ABC wildlife propaganda peddlers. Sure we do have venomous snakes and spiders but as I said most Australian wildlife is very secretive and rarely seen. Snakes hibernate all winter and even in summer just keep out of long grass and you're OK. The only really dangerous native animals are crocodiles found only in nothern Australia. Others such as buffalo and feral pigs are all introduced species. I have spent many nights in the bush and never once even seen anything other than the occassional snake slithering away, which was at all dangerous. Ironically male koalas have a particularly loud and raucous cry which frightens you know what out of you in the middle of the night just above your tent. England may be particulary benign but our American friends in the woods seem to have far more of a problem with marauding bears than anything we Aussies have to contend with.

As far as shark attack is concerned, lunatic surfers dressed in black wet suits and looking for all the world like seals, are sometimes attacked. But even then far more people are killed by lighting strike than are taken by sharks.

The most annoying Australian wildlife by far are the flies which settle on your back in their hundreds and constantly try to get in your eyes and mouth. At night their comrades the mosquitos take over so keep up the repellent.
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #26 - Jun 26th, 2007 at 3:37pm
 
I do not think it matters where you are from, people elsewhere have a distorted view of what your part of the world is like.  Mostly that is because we all get our view of other parts of the world from television (used to be from books); and what sells, is what grabs attention; and what grabs attention, is the sensational.  Where I live, there are cougars all around.  I've never seen a cougar, just tracks.  They are very shy.  They will only attack if you are acting like prey or you are near the cubs.  Yet folks from elsewhere are very nervous about "all those mountain lions."

Similarly, Steve Irwin came over here once and did a tour of North America looking for rattlesnakes.  (The most priceless moment of that series was when he was squatting, looking into a hole where one had just crawled, when another snake started rattling its tail -- right between his legs!  He hammed it up, of course, but his startlement was not entirely feigned.)  Judging by the television, you would think that such snakes are everywhere.  Yet I grew up in country where rattlers were common, and I saw them only a dozen times or so -- mostly on the road, squished.
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #27 - Jun 27th, 2007 at 7:34am
 
[quote]But even then far more people are killed by lighting strike [/quote]
See even the weather is out to get you !

I think the one beast that really sticks in peoples minds is the dunnie spider :-)
Might be a funnel web but it's the one that hides in outhouses and bites you on the bum when you go to the toilet :-)
Probably an urban myth - but in australia, you never know :-)

Saw a program about a hotel out in the bush and they had huntsman spiders in the hotel. Not poisonous - but bloody big and fast and for a spider wimp like me sufficient reason in itself never to set foot in the country :-)
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #28 - Jun 28th, 2007 at 7:33am
 
Even the freakin ants spring at you just to bite you!!!! Shocked
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Re: Throwing techniques
Reply #29 - Jun 28th, 2007 at 10:28pm
 
not overly fond of huntsman spiders myself. just suck em up with a vacuum cleaner.

the dunny spider you mentioned is the red back, known in the us as a black widow. they like quiet out of the way nooks and crannies like wood piles or that dark corner in the garden shed, so bites on the hand are actually more common than on the posterior.
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