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A wooly question, or two (Read 8558 times)
srgs9
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A wooly question, or two
Apr 6th, 2004 at 10:20am
 
I was gifted some angora at the fair last weekend, single ply. The only main problem is I don't trust my brading and don't want to sacrifice good wool(even though it was free and the guy will give me a price break). I was wondering if some one could give me a better discription on "round brading".  Also I was thinking of adding some soften jute,or some such, as a filler and to add abit more color to the project.
I'd also thought about making a sling out of embrodrey floss but I'm not sure how well the stuff would hold up even corded and braded. Any ideas?

Anyway their web site is   www.jeanette@laffing-horse.com

Thanks
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Matthias
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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #1 - Apr 6th, 2004 at 12:27pm
 
I hope they gifted you some angora goat, rather than angora rabbit... as I notice that they have both. Goat fibre is usually called mohair to differentiate. It is nice and strong, but will stretch a bit more than I'd want. I'd try experimenting with felting the finished sling as well, that stuff really grabs... The rabbit will fall apart - even delicately handled clothes items "drift".

If you are friendly with Shawn and Jeanette, I'd see if you could coax them into spinning (spinners are about as hard to get spinning something new/different as slingers are to try out a new sling - and you don't need very much) some llama hair. If he/she uses extra guard hair (which is often not used here in NA) and spins "worsted" with fairly hard twist, I think you'd have some pretty fine replica sling yarn.

Anyone with Andean sling fibre knowledge care to join in? I'm a fibre processor in a former life (muskox - which matches up pretty well against Peruvian vicuña) but don't have much first hand knowledge on what was used historically in this area.

Matthias
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Hobb
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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #2 - Apr 6th, 2004 at 7:03pm
 
I don't know much about fibers, but round braiding around a core is fairly easy (if time consuming).  There are some good links on the links page of this site with drawings.  Basically, start with an even number of strands, half in each hand, one hand on either side of your core.  Take the strand on the far right back, around and behind the core to the opposite side, then weave it under/over/under/over 'til you get it back to it's own side/hand, this time on the inside instead of the outside.  Then take the strand on the far left back, around, and behind the core and do the same thing.  Back to the right, back to the left, etc.  I've seen pictures of softer woolen strands woven around courser, presumably stronger materials, but I've never tried it.
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JeffH
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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #3 - Apr 6th, 2004 at 8:45pm
 
srgs9,

E-mail me privately at theholts@bellsouth.net.  I will send you some pics I just did for doing  a 4 strand round plait.  This technique works with any multiple of four strands as well.

I used four colors of string to help see what is going on.  I made an html file out of my sling instructions, found in the gallery, for a friend without the internet.  I made the plating instructions for him as well.

Maybe I should write up some instructions and let Chris post this in the gallery, eh?  Will consider

jeff <><
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So David triumphed over the Philistine with a sling and a stone. (1 Samuel 17:50)
 
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Chris
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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #4 - Apr 7th, 2004 at 12:20am
 
Yes Jeff, please do!

Chris
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english
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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #5 - Apr 7th, 2004 at 3:21am
 
I find that four strand round plaits take too much time.  I guess I am just not good at it.  In order to plait with four strands, you have to take the strand furthest to the left and twist it round the back of the following two strands and then over the second of those two strands into the middle, and then do the same but from the right.  In order to plait with three strands, you just put the strand furthest to the left over the middle, and then the strand furthest right over that one, which is now the middle.  So you can do a plait much quicker with three.  But four works.
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Ulrica
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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #6 - Apr 7th, 2004 at 6:34am
 
Quote:
 I find that four strand round plaits take too much time. 
So you can do a plait much quicker with three.  But four works.


I guess it´s just about a question fo practice. I can make a fourbraid almost as fast as a tree-one.

/Ulrica
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May the stones go your way&&&&//Ulrica
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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #7 - Apr 7th, 2004 at 11:05am
 
If you're not using a core, there's a shortcut to the four-strand method.  Arrange the strands in a square, then just criss-cross the opposing strands -- top & bottom go clockwise, left & right go counterclockwise as you interchange them (or vice-versa).  I find it a little faster, almost as fast as the 3-strand braid.
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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #8 - Apr 8th, 2004 at 5:37am
 
I guess I just need to practise.  I don't think it could be as fast as three strand braiding, because the movement is more complex, but wih practise, it could be nearly so, I suppose.  Anyway, I will get some string today and get practising.  I think you can make cut price rope if you use a four strand braid using string.  It costs about £1.50 for a six inch diameter ball.  I have tried making rope with a three strand braid, but it is flat (and can only be), and this is bad because the rope would kink all the time, so I will try with a four strand.
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srgs9
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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #9 - Apr 8th, 2004 at 8:25am
 
Thanks Jeff and all,
Sometimes I think I've forgotten more than I knew. (The same is true with what's left of my ablity to speak Russian, at least string doesn't care about spelling or grammer  Wink ...)

Once things slow down later, I'll see what kind of a mess I can make.

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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #10 - Apr 8th, 2004 at 1:21pm
 
Round  braiding is not difficult, just time consuming.  I highly recommend using the Japanese Maru Dai (check out braidershand.com) for braiding.  The 250 braides book is fantastic.  But there are lots of web sites that outline how to do a round braid.  I would recommend getting some cheap yarn or cheap wool and braiding a foot or two using the pattern you like most.  That way you get a feel for how it works, braiding tension, etc.  You'll be happier with your results on your actual sling.  It's harder to unbraid mistakes than it is to braid. 

Embroidery floss  !!Fantastic For Slings!!  My first slings were embroidery floss and it is still my favorite stuff - I like wool only because it's authentic.  Individual floss strands are nearly impossible to break (whereas wool strands can be broken, but once braided they are more than strong enough), they are not slippery like nylon and so braid easily, they come in a thousand colors, they don't rot with moisture, and they look like a natural fibre so the slings appear more authentic (as opposed to nylon).  Go with DMC size 5.  There is less color selection, but the larger strands make for a sling that is about the diameter of a number 2 pencil which is ideal in my opinion (this is for a 16 strand braid or an 8 strand with an 8 core).

anyway, my two cents.
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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #11 - Apr 8th, 2004 at 6:00pm
 
No. 5 Embroidery Floss -- That's a hobby-shop thing, right?  Hobby Lobby or Michael's?  I'm using nylon twine, now, but the colors are kind of limited & the rope's coming out stiff (this is with a 16 strand braid).  I'm sure the rope will break in, but more color choices would be nice.
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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #12 - Apr 8th, 2004 at 7:03pm
 
Embroidery floss for slings.  I always wondered about that.  Thanks Barak.  Maybe I'll give it a try someday myself.  I wonder if you could double up the smaller strands to give more color variation?  I bought some loppy wool yarn that looked good online, but broke so easily I couldn't braid it when it got here.  Stay away from loppy wool yarn!  It's quite hard to find good wool to braid slings.  Jeff H. says that the stuff the Peruvian slings are made of is really nice (he's been altering his slings a bit) and we're looking into whether we could purchase that stuff.  If anyone knows about good natural color, natural fiber, wool yarn, let me know.  I haven't found any anywhere.

                                              Ben
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Matthias
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Reply #13 - Apr 8th, 2004 at 11:48pm
 
You guys that are serious about natural fibre slings should look into the possibility of spinning you own! A few ounces of llama/alpaca/sheep will cost practically nothing and you can make your yarn to spec.

The quantities required for sling construction are so small that simple spindle or even "thigh" spinning is more than enough - no need for cards/wheels etc... You can be almost sure that the fibre used in traditional andean slings was spun on a drop spindle.

Matthias
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Ulrica
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Re: A wooly question, or two
Reply #14 - Apr 9th, 2004 at 8:43am
 
hmmm.
I like the picture of men sitting and spinning.  Grin
So far I just have seen pictures of women doing that.  Smiley

I never tried it so far as I can remember..
Isn´t hard and difficult to learn and to do it well?

If I only knew how to braid a nice sling with split pouch I would really conciderate learning spinning too.

Ulrica
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May the stones go your way&&&&//Ulrica
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