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Message started by Sargon of Akkad on Aug 4th, 2010 at 10:46am

Title: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Sargon of Akkad on Aug 4th, 2010 at 10:46am
Greetings again all.

I've been making various kinds of slings (to be honest, making them is half the fun...) to improve my accuracy.  I've been braiding them because I'm cheap, and using a denim for the pouch.  Yes, from my old jeans.

For accuracy, how do you do things?  Long sling, short sling?  A pouch with the widest point in the centre, or towards/away from the throwing hand? Any other tips?

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by LukeWebb on Aug 4th, 2010 at 11:20am
 Thin, short cords.  Thick braids tend to give me more distance and power, and can throw larger rocks.  The thing to remember is the weight of the rock has to match the thickness of the cords.  If you throw a little rock with a thick braid the sling will not stretch out properly, (my theory,) and the stone will not go where you want it.  But if you use a heavier rock it will shoot perfect.  For most slings I use between a shooter marble to a chicken egg.  You will find that with all of your slings there is a certain weight of projectile that is more accurate from it.  I find if you go too heavy it will sometimes "stick" in the pouch and you will feel a bit of a tug after you have released and the rock will go off course.  A small one will release late usually.  That's not to say that small and big ones can't be thrown from the same sling, I would just not suggest doing that if you are hunting or going for accuracy.
 I also recommend a smaller pouch, and a smooth release cord finish.  Not whipping or anything, just a knot or a bead, and be sure that it is smooth, not with rough glue all over it or you will get late releases.  And keep your tassels coming out of the release cord short, I make mine between 2-4in. max, there are others here that go shorter.
 If you really want to improve your accuracy make up some clay ammunition of different weights, then try them all so you can see roughly what weight is best for the particular sling.  Then make a bunch of ammunition that size.
 Hope this helps.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Bill Skinner on Aug 4th, 2010 at 12:35pm
I haven't been doing this long, but from my limited experiance, everything Luke said is correct.  From my limited experiance, a shorter sling is easier to hit with than a longer one.  Bill

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Dan on Aug 4th, 2010 at 1:25pm

Bill Skinner wrote on Aug 4th, 2010 at 12:35pm:
I haven't been doing this long, but from my limited experiance, everything Luke said is correct.  From my limited experiance, a shorter sling is easier to hit with than a longer one.  Bill


I agree with Luke and Bill short sling for accuracy .

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Rat Man on Aug 4th, 2010 at 2:21pm
I don't get very good accuracy with slings that are too short or too long.  I like slings to be around half my height, folded length, so a 39" sling is good for me.  I get the best accuracy with fast, smooth slings.  These slings generally have thin cords, as Luke said, and thin pouches also.  My most accurate sings are either TS3, Apache, seatbelt, and pj slings.  

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Morphy on Aug 4th, 2010 at 5:23pm
I can't agree with the short sling for accuracy statement either. But it may be true for you so by all means give it a try. This is a very personal sport. Very few aspects in it are capable of total agreement from everyone.  ;) After a lot of different slings and styles you will settle on one that works for you the best. It doesn't matter if it fits anyone else, so long as it works for you.

33-35 inches seems best for me.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by pfchilders on Aug 4th, 2010 at 6:26pm
Definitely a personal endeavor.

I use a split pouch and find that I can throw large rocks (between egg and a little over baseball size) without them releasing late -I can release just liking throwing with the hand -big plus!  I can't use very little rocks because the pouch is about six inches long, but all of my purposes prefer a larger stone anyway.


Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Aussie on Aug 5th, 2010 at 2:32am

Rat Man wrote on Aug 4th, 2010 at 2:21pm:
I don't get very good accuracy with slings that are too short or too long.  I like slings to be around half my height, folded length, so a 39" sling is good for me.  I get the best accuracy with fast, smooth slings.  These slings generally have thin cords, as Luke said, and thin pouches also.  My most accurate sings are either TS3, Apache, seatbelt, and pj slings.  


2 x 39 = 78 or 6' 6" .......... You must be a tall man!!

I also agree that the "short slings are accurate and long slings are fast" mantra is an oversimplification. Sling length must be matched not only to your size, (arm length is really more important than height although they usually go together of course) and your slinging style. Also what you get used to has a great bearing so major changes will likely feel wrong at least at first.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Bill Skinner on Aug 5th, 2010 at 11:57am
I went and measured my first slings.  They were all around 25 inches. (65cm)  I thought I had a pretty good balance between power and accuracy.  As I tried out different ways of throwing and different slings, they have gradually been increasing in length.  My power and my accuracy have both been improving.  Just before I wrote this I went out to try some of my first slings.  They feel too short, I can't hit the side of a barn, (really, my target is up against a metal sided barn) I couldn't get a clean release.  So for me, as I practice and improve, what I am looking for in a sling is changing.  Maybe, as my learning curve flatens, the length that I am comfortable with will stabilize.  Untill then it looks like I will have to build a new sling every week or so.  Bill

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by xxkid123 on Aug 5th, 2010 at 2:53pm
darn puberty, all my slings are getting short. oh well, they still work well :)

i keep them at 25 inches (maybe 20-30 slings of this length?), two at 26, and one (soon to be two) at 27

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by leadrocks on Aug 6th, 2010 at 1:49am
i get the best accuracy pretty much like ratman said. although when i first started slinging i felt better with a shorter sling. once i became more comfortable with my timing i started to move to longer ones. for all purpose i have settled on a length that when holding the sling at my side with my arm straight down, the pouch is just barely clear of the ground. for accuracy i use a projectile about 2 to 3 oz. i get the best distance throws out of a heavier projectile (3.5 to5 oz) out of a long sling, 43 to 50 in. i'm still definately no champ though. it's all a matter of exprimentation. just keep tryin till you find what works for you.  

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Camo-sling on Aug 6th, 2010 at 2:44am
I always get the best accuracy with 25 inch THICK sling

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Paleoarts on Aug 6th, 2010 at 11:04am
i'm most accurate with my simple hunting sling. 30'' thin three strand braid with a flat leather pouch. like Leadrocks, my sling just clears the ground when held at my side. i do think that your body type plays a role in what type and length of sling will work for you, but i think your slinging style has more to do with it. i use a simple single rotation sidearm so a longer sling is no problem, but for more complex styles like figure 8, a shorter sling might prove to be more accurate.

Chris

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Rat Man on Aug 6th, 2010 at 8:00pm
I've also found that as my slinging technique evolves my slings change.  I went the opposite way that Bill and leadrocks did.  I started with long slings... up to 64".  I thought that the longer the sling, the longer the range.  I can't speak about a pirouetting style like Jax or Mr. Boss uses, but for all of the more standard styles, it just isn't so.  There are trade offs and your best sling probably won't be the longest that you can handle.  I still am not comfortable with really short slings.  I like them no shorter than 24".

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Morphy on Aug 6th, 2010 at 9:05pm
Just goes to show how individualistic this sport is Paleo. For me, If I'm trying the side arm throw you use in your video I like a sling about the size your using. Which would be on the shorter end for me. I like a longer one for figure-8.  

I have a pet theory that longer slings could be easier for accuracy then shorter ones within reason.  If you think about the split-second timing it requires to release a stone so that it actually hits a small target a twenty yards, and then consider that a longer sling is traveling a longer arc of circle then a shorter one, then if both are swinging at approximately the same speed the longer sling will take more time to travel through that short window of opportunity for a perfect shot then a really short one.

Anyone feel free to shoot holes in this theory as it's just a theory.   And I can't prove it one way or the other. I think about it like a small gear and a big gear. The small gear might do many revolutions in the same time that a large gear does one even if the base rpm is the same.

Anyone see where I'm going with this, or is this rubbish?  :D

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by xxkid123 on Aug 6th, 2010 at 9:20pm

Morphy wrote on Aug 6th, 2010 at 9:05pm:
Just goes to show how individualistic this sport is Paleo. For me, If I'm trying the side arm throw you use in your video I like a sling about the size your using. Which would be on the shorter end for me. I like a longer one for figure-8.  

I have a pet theory that longer slings could be easier for accuracy then shorter ones within reason.  If you think about the split-second timing it requires to release a stone so that it actually hits a small target a twenty yards, and then consider that a longer sling is traveling a longer arc of circle then a shorter one, then if both are swinging at approximately the same speed the longer sling will take more time to travel through that short window of opportunity for a perfect shot then a really short one.

Anyone feel free to shoot holes in this theory as it's just a theory.   And I can't prove it one way or the other. I think about it like a small gear and a big gear. The small gear might do many revolutions in the same time that a large gear does one even if the base rpm is the same.

Anyone see where I'm going with this, or is this rubbish?  :D


i see where your going, but i don't think that this window of opportunity's time will have increased.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Aussie on Aug 7th, 2010 at 2:27am

Morphy wrote on Aug 6th, 2010 at 9:05pm:
Just goes to show how individualistic this sport is Paleo. For me, If I'm trying the side arm throw you use in your video I like a sling about the size your using. Which would be on the shorter end for me. I like a longer one for figure-8.  

I have a pet theory that longer slings could be easier for accuracy then shorter ones within reason.  If you think about the split-second timing it requires to release a stone so that it actually hits a small target a twenty yards, and then consider that a longer sling is traveling a longer arc of circle then a shorter one, then if both are swinging at approximately the same speed the longer sling will take more time to travel through that short window of opportunity for a perfect shot then a really short one.

Anyone feel free to shoot holes in this theory as it's just a theory.   And I can't prove it one way or the other. I think about it like a small gear and a big gear. The small gear might do many revolutions in the same time that a large gear does one even if the base rpm is the same.

Anyone see where I'm going with this, or is this rubbish?  :D


The scenario you propose is based on the notion that the sling rotates around the slinger's throwing hand. However the pouch's motion is a compound comprised of the sling's rotation and the actual sweep of the arm. This means that the true radius of rotation of the pouch is in fact much larger than the sling's actual length at the time of release. In other words, it ain't quite so simple as it seems.

Nor is the true centre of rotation fixed. During windup the slinger may merely twirl the sling with a slight wrist motion but for the final releas he moves his hand rapidly forward. A further complication is the fact that the sling is not just an extension in line with the slinger's arm but trails significantly behind it. This "trail angle" as I call it varies all the time during an actual throw and is affected by just about everything, ie air drag, sling and projectile mass, the path of the slinger's hand and how quickly the sling is accelerated. In theory the trail angle should be kept as small as possible but in practise this is virtually impossible to do. The "timing and feel" of slinging that all slingers intuitively know about is really about keeping this angle at an optimum level and accelerating the pouch to maximum speed. Rapid acceleration and a small radius of movement drastically increases the trail angle which causes the sling to "close in" or rotate on a smaller effective radius. So now a nominally long sling is actually rotating on a smaller true radius than a slightly shorter one being used more efficiently, causing diminished speed and decreased accuracy.

Sorry that the above is a bit technical and especially hard to follow without diagrams. Some day soon I might get off my backside and produce the necessary diagrams to explain it more fully. In the meantime I recommend watching David Morningstar's wonderful slomos where these effects can be observed.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Morphy on Aug 7th, 2010 at 3:00am
Usually I can keep up with technical theory fairly well but that just went right over my head LOL.    ;D ;D  Thanks a lot for trying to explain it though Aussie.  I will take a look at DM's videos again and see if I can't piece together what your saying. This is coming from a guy who barely passed geometry so it may take me awhile.

One of the reasons I was so sketchy on this theory was the simple fact that if it was the case it should be fairly obvious to anyone who has spent a good amount of time slinging. And yet such is not the case as this entire thread seems to bear out. And as history seems to bear out.  The sling has been around for thousands of years...this should be known by know if it was real. I don't know... Back to the drawing board.  :P


Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Aussie on Aug 7th, 2010 at 7:46am
No, not entirely back to the drawing board. It's only that there are more factors coming into play than the fact that a short sling rotates rapidly around the hand. Short slings are "twitchier" but I think the main thing against long slings and accuracy is that it may be harder to control a long, completely non-rigid implement which is free to move. I'm still fairly convinced that there is an optimum length for every slinger, style, projectile combination that not only gives max. velocity but optimum accuracy as well.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Morphy on Aug 7th, 2010 at 3:16pm

Aussie wrote on Aug 7th, 2010 at 7:46am:
I'm still fairly convinced that there is an optimum length for every slinger, style, projectile combination that not only gives max. velocity but optimum accuracy as well.



I would agree with that statement too. That's something that has been on my mind for awhile. I have been wondering for some time now if somehow one could get a big enough group of fairly seasoned slings to give their arm length, swing style, sling length and type if some sort of pattern would emerge? Might be interesting...

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by peacefuljeffrey on Aug 7th, 2010 at 8:10pm

Rat Man wrote on Aug 4th, 2010 at 2:21pm:
I don't get very good accuracy with slings that are too short or too long.  I like slings to be around half my height, folded length, so a 39" sling is good for me.  I get the best accuracy with fast, smooth slings.  These slings generally have thin cords, as Luke said, and thin pouches also.  My most accurate sings are either TS3, Apache, seatbelt, and pj slings.  


I can't really talk about accuracy because I've never gotten to do any slinging where I was shooting for a target object instead of just hurling rocks or golf balls down a field. Kinda lame.

The way I judge accuracy is to see if my releases go out at about the right elevation and the right degree left-to-right (i.e. straight forward). I use PJ slings, seatbelt slings and woven split pouch slings. They all have single-strand cords made of nylon paracord or other synthetic utility cord. I have never made the more traditional-type slings a lot of folks here have done. It's not that I don't have braiding or knot-tying expertise, it's just that I'm a bit lazy about the time and analysis needed to work out all the complexity.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by peacefuljeffrey on Aug 7th, 2010 at 8:17pm
Oh, I should add that while I do like the idea of using natural materials, I tend to gravitate to using synthetics because I consider them more durable and resistant to various problems (everything from abrasion to moisture). I like the craft of the traditional materials and techniques, but I like the simplicity and worry-free characteristics of synthetics. I don't have to put whippings on my slings, for example, or use glue. The materials are always consistent. There's no need to stitch or sew.

Please don't take me to mean that I'm badmouthing natural slings; I admire them. Not all of the designs suit me, that's true, but in general, I think they're cool. Maybe some day I'll do one in hemp just for the heck of it (since I do have some hemp spools around). It might be nice as a change.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by peacefuljeffrey on Aug 7th, 2010 at 8:31pm

Morphy wrote on Aug 6th, 2010 at 9:05pm:
I have a pet theory that longer slings could be easier for accuracy then shorter ones within reason.  If you think about the split-second timing it requires to release a stone so that it actually hits a small target a twenty yards, and then consider that a longer sling is traveling a longer arc of circle then a shorter one, then if both are swinging at approximately the same speed the longer sling will take more time to travel through that short window of opportunity for a perfect shot then a really short one.

Anyone feel free to shoot holes in this theory as it's just a theory.   And I can't prove it one way or the other. I think about it like a small gear and a big gear. The small gear might do many revolutions in the same time that a large gear does one even if the base rpm is the same.

Anyone see where I'm going with this, or is this rubbish?  :D


I think that your theory is sound, but your gear analogy needs work.
It's not about the RPM staying equal, it's about the speeds being equal.

If, at the pouch, your sling is going 100mph, on a short sling, you will have a higher RPM than on a long sling. Although I'm not well-versed on it, I think this could relate somewhat to Keppler's laws of planetary motion: There's a specific relationship between the period of revolution, the length of the orbit, and the speed of the orbiting object. A planet in a distant orbit (a long one) will arc slower than one in a smaller orbit going the same speed. That's part of why a "year" is not constant among all the planets.

So if you are trying to get the same speed out of two slings, one short and one long, I believe you would have a shorter time period during which to accurately release a short sling than you would a long one, in that "window" mentioned.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Morphy on Aug 7th, 2010 at 9:20pm

peacefuljeffrey wrote on Aug 7th, 2010 at 8:31pm:

Morphy wrote on Aug 6th, 2010 at 9:05pm:
I have a pet theory that longer slings could be easier for accuracy then shorter ones within reason.  If you think about the split-second timing it requires to release a stone so that it actually hits a small target a twenty yards, and then consider that a longer sling is traveling a longer arc of circle then a shorter one, then if both are swinging at approximately the same speed the longer sling will take more time to travel through that short window of opportunity for a perfect shot then a really short one.

Anyone feel free to shoot holes in this theory as it's just a theory.   And I can't prove it one way or the other. I think about it like a small gear and a big gear. The small gear might do many revolutions in the same time that a large gear does one even if the base rpm is the same.

Anyone see where I'm going with this, or is this rubbish?  :D


I think that your theory is sound, but your gear analogy needs work.
It's not about the RPM staying equal, it's about the speeds being equal.

If, at the pouch, your sling is going 100mph, on a short sling, you will have a higher RPM than on a long sling. Although I'm not well-versed on it, I think this could relate somewhat to Keppler's laws of planetary motion: There's a specific relationship between the period of revolution, the length of the orbit, and the speed of the orbiting object. A planet in a distant orbit (a long one) will arc slower than one in a smaller orbit going the same speed. That's part of why a "year" is not constant among all the planets.

So if you are trying to get the same speed out of two slings, one short and one long, I believe you would have a shorter time period during which to accurately release a short sling than you would a long one, in that "window" mentioned.



That's exactly what I was trying to say, except your post managed to make some sense of it. I guess this is one of those things that might be true or might not, but I have no way of proving it. As I said in a earlier post I would guess that it would be a known fact by now if it was true... But at the same time there are many reasons for using the length you use, and perhaps if there is a grain of truth in the theory it is not enough an advantage when compared to the disadvantages that come a long with a long sling. We tend to use a sling for fun, but I can imagine slings were more specialized back when they meant business. Longer for the start of a battle, shorter for hunting in wooded areas... etc.


Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by leadrocks on Aug 8th, 2010 at 10:23pm
something i have been working on that seems to have improved my accuracy considerably. i know similar explanations of this have been posted many times. my release timing stays consistent. i use a sidearm throw that kinda switches to a more byzantine style on shorter target throws. i keep my body angle to the target and my release timing the same on every throw. Just change the angle that i bring the sling around to change elevation/distance. shorter distance throws come around almost over my shoulder and longer distance throws come around below my waist. seems to help eliminate some of the variables in the throw. helps me a lot.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Rockman on Aug 9th, 2010 at 4:43pm
I can say for a fact that a shorter sling is more accurate, but you loose power. And vice-versa.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by walter on Aug 9th, 2010 at 6:06pm
Started out with 30 to 33 inch slings. It's been a few years and now my slings are all 26 to 28 inches. Not much difference in length, but a huge difference in accuracy. I'm sure practice has something to do with it  ;), but I'm much better with a 28 inch sling than a 30 inch sling.

I use Aussie's seatbelt sling as a standard, trying to match its performance with hemp and wool over hemp split pouch slings. Finally made a hemp sling that is as good as the seatbelt. The wool over hemp just a bit slower. These slings have small diameter cords and short split pouches.

walter

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by lobohunter on Aug 25th, 2017 at 6:37pm
the change in slings that improved my accuracy most was the wrist loop

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Morphy on Aug 25th, 2017 at 8:03pm
The things I have come to use include paracord, instead of the wool I used when first commenting on this thread as well as a tab of sufficient thickness and size. 

For the most part though I think most slings can work well. Especially if you've taken the time to get used to them. Never tried the wrist loop, though it looks intriguing.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Jaegoor on Aug 26th, 2017 at 1:51am
Stellen sie sich hin. Ihre Schleuder reicht bis zum Boden. Wenige cm über denn Boden. Diese Länge ist optimal. Achten sie auf die  Art des geflechtes . Zu locker ist nicht gut .  Zu dünn ist auch nicht gut. Sind sie ein erfahrener slinger, dann ok.
Lieber etwas weniger Geschwindigkeit .  Ich selbst mag Balearic Slings für die Genauigkeit.  Ihr Schwerpunkt liegt nicht in der Mitte .  Eine schallzunge / bremse erhöht die Genauigkeit erheblich.
Achten sie auf ein stabiles Zentrum. Zielen sie mit dem Bauchnabel. Der arm folgt der Hüfte . Nicht umgekehrt .  Ihr Schuß geht zu weit nach Links?  Zuviel Power im Arm. Sie haben bald schmerzen in Schulter und Ellenbogen. Es bilden sich blasen am Finger.
Ihr Schuß geht zu weit rechts? Ihr Bauchnabel zeigt nicht auf das Ziel. Sie schießen in die Richtung die ihr Bauchnabel zeigt.
Es kann schmerzen im unteren rücken geben.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by lobohunter on Aug 26th, 2017 at 5:24pm
or as Jaegoor said Sit down. Your sling reaches the floor. Few cm above ground. This length is optimal. Pay attention to the nature of the braid. Too loose is not good. Too thin is also not good. Are they an experienced slinger, then ok.
Better a little less speed. I like Balearic Slings for accuracy. Their focus is not in the middle. A sound / brake increases the accuracy considerably.
Look for a stable center. Aim with the navel. The arm follows the hip. Not the other way around . Your shot goes too far to the left? Too much power in the arm. You soon have a pain in the shoulder and elbow. It will form blow on the finger.
Your shot goes too far right? Your belly button does not point to the target. They shoot in the direction that shows their belly button.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Eudave on Mar 16th, 2019 at 5:49pm
Has any one tried using fine chain? i am thinking of trying it .
will small swivels between the components . I would hope that it allows the system to reach some type of equilibrium.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Eudave on Mar 16th, 2019 at 5:52pm
Has any one tried using fine chain? i am thinking of trying it .
will small swivels between the components . I would hope that it allows the system to reach some type of equilibrium.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Kick on Mar 17th, 2019 at 4:49am
Problem with chain is what happens to that end once you let go. It can sometimes be bad enough being whipped by paracord, getting hit with thin chain could leave you with an interesting scar that will be a good ice breaker at parties but might not be worth the pain...

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Jaegoor on Mar 18th, 2019 at 6:01am
Was ist der Sinn? Warum eine Kette?

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Sarosh on Mar 18th, 2019 at 12:27pm

Jaegoor wrote on Aug 26th, 2017 at 1:51am:
Eine schallzunge / bremse erhöht die Genauigkeit erheblich.


hey jaegoor where can I read more about this? or is there an explanation why this happens?


Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Jaegoor on Mar 18th, 2019 at 5:51pm
Sarosh. Es beruht auf Erfahrung und Beobachtung. Ich versuche eine Erklärung. Vielleicht ist es zu verstehen.
Diese Schallzunge bremst das Ende der Sling ab. Dadurch öffnet sich die sling besser. Der schusslauf rollt besser ab. Der Schuß wird genauer. Durch häufiges schießen, verkürzt sich die Schallzunge. Durch denn schall knall.
Ihre Schüsse werden nach links wandern.
Am knall hören Sie auch mit wieviel Power Sie schießen.
Bei einer sehr langen sling braucht man keine Schallzunge. Sie ist sogar hinterlich. Der lange Schusslauf wird von der Luft gebremst. Durch seine Länge. Ich habe irgendwo Fotos wo man das sehen kann. Bei einem Schuß mit hohen spin, sieht ihre sling wie eine Angel aus. Es wirkt wie beim Fischen mit Fliegen. 😁

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Sarosh on Mar 19th, 2019 at 4:02am
Jaegoor Thanks for the answer, it's understandable. ;)
I'll do some experiments.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Eudave on Mar 31st, 2019 at 4:37pm
Hi I am new to this game but it is fun.please correct me if wrong .
it seems to me that rotating the sling is of consequence only if the projectile leaves at a tangent to the circle.
With my self I notice that I twitch the sling to release which seems to me to be the more important movement .. the twirl acts to break inertia. I am sure it adds something to the speed of the projectile but  the variables must be  horrendous to calculate .for the most part Slinging  is about feel ,at least it is for me not sure about anyone else .

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Jaegoor on Mar 31st, 2019 at 5:35pm
Hola und herzlich willkommen. Im großen und ganzen liegst du richtig. Aber der Rotor kann noch mehr. Mit der Stellung des Rotor kann man Distanzen bestimmen.. Der Rotor ist wichtig für das schießen auf bewegliche Ziele.
Zum Beispiel auf ein Pendel. Mit Rotor bleiben Sie in einer flexiblen Dynamik.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=hA8jCanAkTw


Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Eudave on Apr 3rd, 2019 at 5:26pm
xxkid123
is that I am  a hot potato?

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Eudave on Apr 14th, 2019 at 4:48pm
I have been slinging for a very short time ..less than a year ..and half of that was Midwest winter ,but i have found a 31 incher is good for me. i am five foot seven. Just tried a forty inch single strand para cord .couldn't do a thing with it except hold my pants up ..any suggestions would be helpful. other than get a new belt.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by walter on Apr 14th, 2019 at 9:49pm
@ Eudave, stick with what works good for you, and maybe try a shorter sling ;)


Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Kick on Apr 15th, 2019 at 3:34am
When it comes to slinging, you can never do enough experimentation.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by NooneOfConsequence on Apr 15th, 2019 at 10:39pm
Practice practice practice. One of the things that makes slings so interesting is the lack of constraints. You can control timing, direction, speed, and ammo spin (“rifling”) entirely with muscle memory and throwing style. No other projectile weapon has as much flexibility as a sling. That’s also why accuracy is so difficult to master.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Jauke on Apr 16th, 2019 at 6:08am
What. This is the first time I discover this Sargon guy has a slinging account

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by TheJackinati on Apr 16th, 2019 at 6:23am
To be honest, his slinging video is the only video of his that I watch. I'm not really into political video's, nor Into politics.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Jauke on Apr 16th, 2019 at 8:25am

TheJackinati wrote on Apr 16th, 2019 at 6:23am:
To be honest, his slinging video is the only video of his that I watch. I'm not really into political video's, nor Into politics.


I agree. I consider myself retired from it all. Constant stream of negativity, I am just tired of it. Same with regular cinema. We really have to be more selective with the things we feed our mind with.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Kick on Apr 16th, 2019 at 11:28am
Oh wow I never actually read through the start of this thread. I had seen his slinging videos but didn't realise he had posted on here. Yeah I feel his videos nowadays aren't really... my cup of tea...

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Eudave on May 29th, 2019 at 4:52pm
Iam nine years late on this one .Not been slinging long but been fiddling with things for ever .
so far my most accurate is a 20 inch sling with three inch pouch the cord is waxed linen for stringing beads .it is brown and can be got from most bead stores. Linen is a  very strong material it has long fibers ( Bast ) which hold it all together .
  MY next best size is  31 inch but needs heavier missiles.

Title: Re: Sling manufacturing techniques for accuracy.
Post by Eudave on Jun 7th, 2019 at 5:00pm
i have tried 20 inch slings from 65 feet and find they will drop the rock withing three feet either side of target .if i allow the release to be for a high one i can get about 120 feet . i use thin cords .I don't like the feel of thick ones ,they feel clunky to me .my longest is 48 inches not that accurate but easily two hundred feet ,and i am a rank beginner .

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